Protect, Respect, and Restore Snoqualmie Tribe Ancestral Lands

 

Through education and awareness, individuals can integrate land acknowledgment and respect for the Snoqualmie Tribe into their recreational practices and experiences.

The Ancestral Lands Movement seeks to spread awareness of the Snoqualmie people who have lived in the southern Salish Sea since time immemorial and share the significance of these lands and provide information on how people can help the Tribe in respecting, restoring, and protecting these lands.

As the Salish Sea region has grown in population, the Snoqualmie Tribe’s ancestral lands have been heavily impacted by recreation. This impact is especially apparent at the popular trails in the Snoqualmie corridor area where increased visitation has resulted in a degradation of the land.

To Learn More about the Snoqualmie Tribe Ancestral Lands Movement:

Would your business or organization like to support the Snoqualmie Tribe Ancestral Lands Movement? Connect with us by filling out this form: https://forms.gle/3CYDSuUTuFw7ykHr7

Sign the Pledge!

There are simple steps everyone can take while recreating on Snoqualmie ancestral lands to practice respect and help the Tribe in protecting and restoring these lands for generations to come. Sign this pledge to show your support for this effort, and to encourage others to do the same. 

  1. Treat the lands with the respect they deserve, by picking up your own trash, and that of others that you see, properly disposing of pet waste, and staying on designated trails.
  2. Commit to experience the lands in a way that is centered in mindfulness rather than conquest.
  3. Learn more about the Snoqualmie Tribe and its history and deep connections to these lands, and support the work the Tribe does today to continue stewarding these lands
  4. Acknowledge that you are recreating on Snoqualmie ancestral lands through both written or verbal acknowledgement and through practice
  5. Help the Tribe spread its message by encouraging others to learn more and practice land acknowledgment both on and off the trails