LATEST GLOBAL INDIGENOUS NEWS

IHS: Healthy Lifestyles in Youth Project

The Indian Health Service is accepting applications for a single entity to promote healthy lifestyles for American Indian and Alaska Native youth through collaboration with selected Native American Boys and Girls Club sites. Applications are due September 15, 2022.

Native America Calling: Saving the migratory Monarch butterfly

INDIANZ.COM - August 12, 2022 - 12:00am
All Episodes on Spotify | More Options
Native America Calling: Saving the migratory Monarch butterfly
Friday, August 12, 2022

Saving the migratory Monarch butterfly
The fragile-looking Monarch butterfly possesses a strength and resilience that allows it to survive a migration that covers thousands of miles through the heart of the country.

That resilience is now put to the test, as habitat destruction and climate change have made it necessary to officially list the insect’s status as “endangered.” Tribes are among those helping to protect Monarchs, for both cultural and environmental reasons.

Monarch Butterfly The migratory monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus plexippus) has entered the IUCN Red List as Endangered. Photo: Joe Schelling

Friday on Native America Calling, Shawn Spruce speaks with scientists and tribal members who are on the frontlines of saving the Monarch butterfly and, in turn, our ecosystem.

native america calling
Native America Calling
Listen to Native America Calling every weekday at 1pm Eastern.
Alternate Links: Native Voice One | NAC

Calif.'s Broad Nuisance Law Key To Walgreens Opioid Liability

LAW360 (Native feed) - August 11, 2022 - 7:32pm
A California federal judge's decision Wednesday holding Walgreens liable for substantially contributing to the opioid crisis in San Francisco was bolstered by the Golden State's broad public nuisance law, but whether other states similarly apply the legal doctrine remains to be seen, lawyers told Law360.

Winless In Opioid Bouts, Will Pharmacies Throw In The Towel?

LAW360 (Native feed) - August 11, 2022 - 7:15pm
A California federal judge's walloping of Walgreens over its narcotic painkiller sales in San Francisco has left pharmacy chains 0 for 2 in opioid trials and is casting doubt on the companies' apparent plans to continue stepping into the legal ring with government adversaries.

Tribal Colleges and Universities: What to Know

TRIBAL COLLEGE JOURNAL - August 11, 2022 - 6:44pm

These public institutions of higher education are charted by federally recognized Indian tribes or the federal government, with majority Native American or Alaska Native student enrollment.

The post Tribal Colleges and Universities: What to Know appeared first on Tribal College Journal of American Indian Higher Education.

LCO College Offering August Field Trip to Penokee Range

TRIBAL COLLEGE JOURNAL - August 11, 2022 - 6:44pm

The trip is to the Penokee Range for a hike in and along the canyon, an ancient Precambrian water gap containing biological and geological features, including a rare hemlock/cedar forest at the top.

The post LCO College Offering August Field Trip to Penokee Range appeared first on Tribal College Journal of American Indian Higher Education.

Public Invited to WINHEC Events at FDLTCC

TRIBAL COLLEGE JOURNAL - August 11, 2022 - 6:43pm

Members of the public are invited to attend a series of community events held in conjunction with Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College hosting the Annual Gathering of the World Indigenous Nations Higher Education Consortium.

The post Public Invited to WINHEC Events at FDLTCC appeared first on Tribal College Journal of American Indian Higher Education.

Lennox Island treaty fishers join P.E.I.'s fall lobster fishery for 1st time

CBC ABORIGINAL NEWS - August 11, 2022 - 6:15pm
Lennox Island boats in Borden

For the first time — and possibly the last time — treaty fishers from Lennox Island First Nation are taking part in Prince Edward Island’s fall lobster fishery.

White House releases fact sheet on internet in tribal communities

INDIANZ.COM - August 11, 2022 - 5:38pm
Indianz.Com Video: Vice President Kamala Harris announces investments for internet in tribal communities
Biden-Harris Administration Brings High-Speed, Affordable Internet to Tribal Communities
Department of Commerce announces $146 million in awards through the Tribal Broadband Connectivity Program, with another $1 billion in funding now available
Thursday, August 11, 2022
Indianz.Com

The following is the text of an August 11, 2022, fact sheet from the White House.

In the 21st century, access to affordable, high-speed internet is no longer a luxury: American families need high-quality internet to do their jobs, participate in school, access health care, and stay connected. But far too many Tribal communities remain unconnected: by one definition, over 30 percent of the population on Tribal lands do not have access to broadband infrastructure that provides minimally adequate speeds.

The Biden-Harris Administration has set a clear goal of bringing affordable, reliable, high-speed internet to every American. To help make this goal a reality, President Biden secured a historic $65 billion investment to expand internet access through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law and has mobilized additional resources from across the federal government, including programs created by the American Rescue Plan.

These investments are already making a difference in Tribal communities, bringing new internet service to Native American, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian households and businesses. Through all of its work with Tribal communities, including broadband infrastructure programs, the Biden-Harris Administration is committed to honoring the Nation-to-Nation relationship with Tribal governments, conducting robust tribal consultation, and investing in the resilience and prosperity of Tribal communities.

Today, the Department of Commerce National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) announced $146 million in awards to bring high-speed internet to Tribal communities in New Mexico through the Tribal Broadband Connectivity Program. Throughout August, NTIA will announce additional awards, totaling more than $500 million. Funding will serve Tribes across the country including in Alaska, Nebraska, South Dakota, Arizona, California, and more states, in addition to today’s awards in New Mexico.

NTIA has also announced that it is making an additional $1 billion in funding available to Tribal communities. This $1 billion from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law will fund additional Tribal broadband applications already submitted to NTIA, bringing the total available under the funding opportunity announced in June 2021 to $1.98 billion. NTIA received more than 300 applications during the application window for over $5 billion in requested funding, demonstrating the significant infrastructure needs in Tribal communities. Making an additional $1 billion available under the current funding opportunity will allow the Department of Commerce to quickly allocate these funds to communities in need, without requiring Tribes to reapply.

This additional $1 billion at NTIA comes on top of other funding for high-speed internet available to Tribal communities—including $1 billion in funding currently available through the Department of Agriculture’s Reconnect Program, as well as $100 million currently available through the Department of the Treasury’s Capital Projects Fund.

But making internet available is not enough: families must be able to afford service and have the skills, technology, and capacity to take advantage of the opportunities that the internet offers. That’s why the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law provides $2.75 billion to promote digital equity and inclusion, aiming to ensure that all people and communities can reap the full benefits of the digital economy.

Tribal governments are ready to lead this work: 470 Tribes in 28 states – over 80 percent of federally-recognized Tribes – have indicated that they would like to participate in the Digital Equity Planning Grant program, the first phase of the digital equity programs. In the coming months, the Department of Commerce will work with Tribes to submit applications and then award funds to Tribes to develop digital equity plans to help their communities adopt and use high-speed internet.

Moving forward, the Administration will continue to invest in internet access and digital equity for Tribal communities. NTIA will develop another opportunity to apply for funding under the Tribal Broadband Connectivity Program, and the Administration will coordinate resources across government to meet connectivity needs in Tribal communities. For example, NTIA and the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Indian Affairs have signed a Memorandum of Understanding to coordinate responsibilities for ensuring compliance with environmental, historic preservation, and cultural resources requirements in the program, bringing additional expertise and coordination to efforts to increase Tribal connectivity.

Indianz.Com Audio: White House Press Call – Increasing Access to High-Speed Internet for Tribal Communities – August 11, 2022

BIDEN-HARRIS ADMINISTRATION ACTIONS TO BRING HIGH-SPEED, AFFORDABLE INTERNET TO TRIBAL COMMUNITIES
Today’s announcement is part of a government-wide effort to deliver high-speed internet infrastructure to Tribal communities, create more low-cost internet service options, and address digital equity and inclusion needs to ensure that Native American, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian families can take full advantage of the opportunities offered by internet service. Steps taken by the Administration in recent months include:

• In July, the Department of Agriculture announced nearly $117 million in rural broadband awards that will serve Native communities or Tribal lands. These funds through the ReConnect Program will bring fiber broadband infrastructure and affordable internet service to 4,300 people in Alaska, 1,000 people in Montana, and 200 people in Arizona. The ReConnect Program brings high-speed internet infrastructure to underserved rural communities. The Department of Agriculture recently announced that $1 billion is now available under the ReConnect Program, with applications accepted beginning on September 6th.

• The Department of the Treasury has awarded 87 Tribal governments $14.6 million from the Capital Projects Fund for projects to expand internet access and increase connectivity, with an additional $85.4 million available to Tribal governments that have not yet claimed their allocation. The Capital Projects Fund provides a total of $100 million to Tribal governments for capital projects that increase access to work, education, and health services, including through reliable, affordable high-speed internet access. For example, some Tribal governments are using these funds to help families or local libraries purchase laptops, install public WiFi access points, or expand community centers that offer computer labs and internet access. Treasury will make additional awards on a rolling basis. Tribal governments are each entitled to an allocation of about $167,500 but must claim their funds by submitting a request for funding to the Treasury Department by August 15th, 2022.

• In July, the Department of Commerce announced over $10 million in grants to expand high-speed internet to minority-serving colleges and universities. The Connecting Minority Communities Program expands internet access at Tribal Colleges and Universities, Minority-Serving Institutions, and Historically Black Colleges and Universities by supporting the purchase of broadband internet access, eligible equipment, or hiring and training information technology personnel. So far, the program has awarded $2.9 million to Diné College to improve educational and economic opportunity for the Navajo Nation and $1.9 million to Tohono O’odham Community College to address the lack of broadband access, adoption, and equity at the college and in the surrounding anchor communities in Tohono O’odham Nation. The program will announce additional awards on a rolling basis.

• Over 185,000 households on Tribal lands are saving up to $75 per month on their internet bills through the Affordable Connectivity Program (ACP). Created by the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law, ACP provides a discount of up to $75 per month on internet bills for households on Tribal lands (or a discount of up to $30/month for other households), as well as a one-time $100 discount on a connected device. To further lower costs, President Biden and Vice President Harris announced commitments from 20 internet service providers across the country to offer high-speed plans that are fully covered by the ACP—meaning millions of working families can now get high-speed internet without paying a dime.

• Households are eligible if they earn 200 percent of the Federal Poverty Guidelines or less (currently $55,500 for a family of four) or if they already participate in certain federal programs, including a wide range of Tribal assistance programs. Specifically, households participating in the following Tribal assistance programs are automatically eligible for ACP: Bureau of Indian Affairs General Assistance, Tribal Head Start (if the household meets the relevant income qualifying standard), Tribal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, and the Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations.

While millions of households across the country have signed up to save, many more are eligible. Households can check their eligibility, find a fully-covered plan, and sign up at GetInternet.gov.

Moving forward, the Biden-Harris Administration will continue to take bold, concerted action to expand internet access and digital equity in Tribal communities.

• Throughout the month of September, the Biden-Harris Administration will host the 2022 Tribal Broadband Summit. The virtual summit – coordinated and hosted jointly by the Department of the Interior, the Institute of Museum and Library Services, the Department of Agriculture, and NTIA – will provide an opportunity for leaders across the broadband development ecosystem to share best practices, new ideas, and lessons learned from their experience of bringing high-speed internet to Tribal communities. Federal partners, Tribal and Native Hawaiian Community broadband industry experts, and other participants will discuss how to coordinate and make the best use of federal funding and how to plan for the future of digital economies on Tribal Lands and across Native Hawaiian communities.

• Additional investments in internet access and digital equity through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law will build on the progress to date. The Bipartisan Infrastructure Law establishes a $42.45 billion Broadband Equity, Access, and Deployment (BEAD) Program to expand high-speed internet access to areas currently unserved or underserved by funding planning, infrastructure deployment, and adoption programs. State action plans for how to use BEAD funds must be informed by collaboration with Tribal governments, including through Tribal consultation, if there are Tribal Nations located within the state.

• The Federal Communications Commission is also taking action to prevent digital discrimination, under a Bipartisan Infrastructure Law requirement for rules to ensure all people benefit from equal access to broadband internet service. The FCC launched work on these rules in March.

The Biden-Harris Administration’s commitment to Indian Country goes well beyond high-speed internet. The Bipartisan Infrastructure Law makes a historic investment of $13 billion in dedicated funding for Tribes, as well as hundreds of billions of dollars that Tribes can apply for on a competitive basis. To date, more than $2.6 billion in Bipartisan Infrastructure Law funding has been announced and is headed to Tribal communities. This year alone, Tribes will receive more than $800 million in set aside funds for transportation to invest in roads, bridges, and public transit and over $150 million set aside for clean water. By the time implementation is complete, the law will have made the largest single investment in Tribal infrastructure ever in United States history.

NM Judge Trims Navajo Farmers' Claims In Gold King MDL

LAW360 (Native feed) - August 11, 2022 - 4:36pm
A New Mexico federal judge on Thursday cut some claims and preserved others brought by Navajo farmers and ranchers against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and an EPA contractor for noneconomic damages from the 2015 Gold King Mine spill.

DVIDS: San Carlos Apache Tribe dedicates building to fallen veteran

INDIANZ.COM - August 11, 2022 - 4:17pm
San Carlos Apache Tribe Officials, 3rd LAR honor fallen Marine with building dedication Family members of Pfc. Michael A. Noline stand after being called up by Cory Noline, son of Michael, during the dedication ceremony of the Michael A. Noline Community Building at the San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation, Arizona, May 14, 2022. Michael, a member of the San Carlos Apache Tribe, who served as a light armored vehicle (LAV) crewman for 3rd Light Armored Infantry Battalion, was killed in action in support of Operation Desert Storm, January 26, 1991. U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Shane T. Beaubien
San Carlos Apache Tribe Officials, 3rd LAR honor fallen Marine with building dedication
Thursday, August 11, 2022
Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, Twentynine Palms
DOD DVIDS

PERIDOT DISTRICT, SAN CARLOS APACHE INDIAN RESERVATION, Arizona — A platoon of U.S. Marines with 3rd Light Armored Reconnaissance (LAR) Battalion, 1st Marine Division, participated in a dedication ceremony of the Michael A. Noline Community building, honoring Pfc. Michael A. Noline, a fallen member of their battalion at the San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation in Arizona, May 14, 2022.

Noline, a member of the San Carlos Apache Tribe, served as a light armored vehicle (LAV), crewman for 3rd Light Armored Infantry Battalion from 1990 to 1991. Noline deployed with the battalion in support of Operation Desert Storm and was killed in action on January 26, 1991.

“Coming here to help dedicate this building to the name of Pfc. Noline, it’s a realization of how real this stuff is,” said Sgt. Brandon D. Tranum, the color sergeant for 3rd LAR Battalion. “You see everyone getting emotional in the audience because this is super real to them.”

“I feel humbled to be here.”

San Carlos Apache Tribe Officials, 3rd LAR honor fallen Marine with building dedication Capt. Curran Boyce, a platoon commander with 3rd Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, 1st Marine Division, assists local veterans before the dedication ceremony of the Michael A. Noline Community Building, honoring Pfc. Michael A. Noline, a fallen member of their battalion at the San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation, Arizona, May 14, 2022. Noline, a member of the San Carlos Apache Tribe, who served as a light armored vehicle (LAV) crewman for 3rd Light Armored Infantry Battalion, was killed in action in support of Operation Desert Storm, January 26, 1991. U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Shane T. Beaubien

During the ceremony, the Marines presented the American flag and Marine Corps flag with the battalion’s color guard and took seats among the audience as San Carlos Apache Tribe officials, Noline’s family members, Wolf Pack Association members and Lt. Col. Zebulon Philpott, commander of 3rd LAR Battalion gave their remarks honoring Noline. Tribe officials were presented with three plaques from the Wolfpack Association to commemorate the day. The Wolfpack Association is a non-profit organization that connects past and current members of 3rd LAR Battalion.

“The plaques were designed as shields, the first one you saw represents the past which was 3rd Light Armored Infantry Battalion, the second represents today’s 3rd LAR and the third plaque is the Wolf Pack Association itself,” said Tranum.

“For everyone that’s been here today, it’s amazing to see the influence of one person,” said Cory Noline, son of Noline. “The influence of a Marine.”

San Carlos Apache Tribe Officials, 3rd LAR honor fallen Marine with building dedication
Valerie Key-Cheney, a Peridot District councilwoman, gives her remarks to the audience during the dedication ceremony of the Michael A. Noline Community Building, honoring Pfc. Michael A. Noline at the San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation, Arizona, May 14, 2022. Noline, a member of the San Carlos Apache Tribe, who served as a light armored vehicle (LAV) crewman for 3rd Light Armored Infantry Battalion, was killed in action in support of Operation Desert Storm, January 26, 1991. U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Shane T. Beaubien

Tribe officials decided to name the building after Noline to honor his memory and, his service to the tribe and to the nation. The community building will serve as a venue for a variety of needs for all San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation residents.

“They wanted to do a building that was going to have a lot of use to the community and they wanted to dedicate it to father’s name,” said Cory. “Upon hearing about that, I had been working with the Wolf Pack Association.”

“I reached out to them, their president and he reached out to the 3rd LAR and asked if you could attend this with us.”

After the ceremony, participants had lunch together, shared stories and took photos to commemorate the occasion.

“Everybody here for the most part are Marine veterans, army veterans and they all get it,” said Tranum. “They lived the same life we live now.”

“They really made us feel at home.”

Following the luncheon, the Marines and guests visited Noline’s final resting place to pay final respects before parting ways.

San Carlos Apache Tribe Officials, 3rd LAR honor fallen Marine with building dedication Local veteran attendees listen as remarks are given during the dedication ceremony of the Michael A. Noline Community Building, honoring Pfc. Michael A. Noline at the San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation, Arizona, May 14, 2022. Noline, a member of the San Carlos Apache Tribe, who served as a light armored vehicle (LAV) crewman for 3rd Light Armored Infantry Battalion, was killed in action in support of Operation Desert Storm, January 26, 1991. U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Shane T. Beaubien

Photos: San Carlos Apache Tribe Officials, 3rd LAR honor fallen Marine with building dedication


DVIDS (Defense Video Imagery Distribution System) is a state-of-the-art, 24/7 operation that provides a timely, accurate and reliable connection between the media around the world and the military serving worldwide. This article is in the public domain.

Cambridge Bay wrestler wins 1st gold for Nunavut at Canada Summer Games

CBC ABORIGINAL NEWS - August 11, 2022 - 4:08pm
Eekeeluak Avalak

Cambridge Bay wrestler Eekeeluak Avalak, 18, rose to the top at the Canada Summer Games underway in Niagara Falls, Ont. He won his final on Thursday afternoon by a wide margin. "We are so proud of him," his mother said.

Priest's remains removed from Kahnawake after sex abuse allegations

CBC ABORIGINAL NEWS - August 11, 2022 - 3:58pm
Residential School Remains 20210529

The remains of a priest alleged to have sexually abused children have been exhumed and removed from the Mohawk community of Kahnawake following a vote in March.

Court rejects former Esgenoôpetitj chief's appeal of sexual assault convictions

CBC ABORIGINAL NEWS - August 11, 2022 - 3:48pm
Wilbur Dedam May 2021

The New Brunswick Court of Appeal has dismissed an appeal by former Esgenoôpetitj First Nation chief Wilbur Dedam of his four sexual assault convictions from a trial two years ago.

Mich. Wins Chance To Tax Tribe's Members Off-Reservation

LAW360 (Native feed) - August 11, 2022 - 2:32pm
A federal judge on Thursday amended an injunction that prevented Michigan from collecting use tax from members of an American Indian tribe both inside and outside its tribal boundaries, saying state law could allow apportionment for off-reservation taxation of tribal members.

NICC Focuses on Financial Sovereignty with Carpentry Courses

TRIBAL COLLEGE JOURNAL - August 11, 2022 - 2:11pm

Sustainability of the economic ecosystems in Indian Country can flourish when production and supply chains start and end with Native populations.

The post NICC Focuses on Financial Sovereignty with Carpentry Courses appeared first on Tribal College Journal of American Indian Higher Education.

Gov't Agencies Team Up For Tribal Broadband Program

LAW360 (Native feed) - August 11, 2022 - 1:21pm
Two federal agencies have agreed to comply with a tribal broadband internet program's requirements for cultural resources, historic preservation and environmental protection, which will allow "high-speed internet service to be deployed quickly while also ensuring safeguards to protect Native lands and interests."

Meet The ABA's New President-Elect

LAW360 (Native feed) - August 11, 2022 - 12:23pm
As Deborah Enix-Ross entered her term as president of the American Bar Association earlier this week, Mary L. Smith was waiting in the wings.

Nebraska Indian Community College Bolsters Greenhouses with Hydroponic Capabilities

TRIBAL COLLEGE JOURNAL - August 11, 2022 - 12:22pm

The hydroponics system at Macy was completed in the past few weeks, and the system in Santee is already growing peppers and tomatoes.

The post Nebraska Indian Community College Bolsters Greenhouses with Hydroponic Capabilities appeared first on Tribal College Journal of American Indian Higher Education.

Thursday, August 11, 2022

NATIONAL NATIVE NEWS (nativetimes.net) - August 11, 2022 - 11:58am

Anchor: Antonia Gonzales

Last year, we reported on how the Coquille Tribe was using a special electrified boat from the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife to remove invasive bass.

KLCC’s Brian Bull has an update on how that effort is being doubled.

Last summer, the ODFW’s Gary Vanderohe explained how his agency’s boat worked, as he took us up the Coquille River. 

“We have a generator that’s underneath the seat, and then there’s a box in the steering console that converts the electricity, which is an AC electricity into a DC electricity, which is a little bit easier on the fish, it just kinda stuns them.” 

This year, through a 100-thousand dollar grant from the Confederated Tribes of the Grande Ronde, the Coquille will soon have their own craft.

Helena Linnell, biological planning and operations manager for the Coquille Tribe, explains why it’s vital to remove bass. 

“They’ve been here for over a decade, and they are having decimating effects on salmonids. So fall Chinook and other salmon species.” 

The tribe expects to have the boat delivered next year, so they and the ODFW can double-team the invasive bass. 

Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez, who’s seeking another term in office, announced his running mate this week during a campaign event in Window Rock, AZ.

His pick is Chad Abeyta for vice president. Abeyta is an Airforce Veteran and an attorney.

During an announcement event streamed live on social media, Abeyta talked about his qualifications and vision for the administration if they win.

“I bring to the table leadership skills, critical thinking and I plan to use creative solutions to addressing a lot of these things. And I’ll be in support of President Nez and his platform and I’d like to continue the work that he’s doing so far.”

Nez received the most votes for president in the primary election.

The second top vote getter was Buu Nygren who also announced his running mate this week.

Nygren chose Richelle Montoya, a local community leader and school board member, for vice president.

If they’re elected, Montoya would be the first woman vice president of the Navajo Nation.

During a campaign event also held in Window Rock, AZ and streamed live on social media,

Montoya says she has strong matriarchs – past and present. 

“Nine sisters that brought my teaching, my prayers, my songs to who I am today. I have no doubt in what they taught me. I have no doubt in that I can stand here and be a running mate for Dr. Buu Nygren. I have the strength of my ancestors.”

Nygren says his campaign is about the voices of the people and a lot of people across Navajo land expressed the need for women leadership in the president’s office.

There were 15 candidates running for president in the August 2 primary.

Voters will head to the polls to pick their next president during the general election in November.

The Navajo Nation is one of the largest tribes in the United States with the largest reservation spanning the Four Corners region.

Pueblo leaders are condemning the defacement and desecration of cultural property in Bandelier National Monument in New Mexico.

The All Pueblo Council of Governors, which represents 20 Pueblo Nations in New Mexico and Texas, recently received notice from the National Park Service of vandalism and damage to a Kiva.

Pueblo leaders are calling for improved management of the area for preservation of sacred landscapes and for the public to stop desecrating traditional cultural properties.

The latest incident at the monument marks the fifth known such vandalism to Indigenous cultural properties in the area.

Pueblo leaders are seeking a complete investigation and the strengthening of co-management procedures to help prevent more incidents like the latest one.

Photo: Corey Coyle

The National Indian Gaming Commission on Wednesday released 2021 Indian gaming revenue numbers totaling $39 billion, an increase of 40% from 2020.

According to the commission, it’s the highest in Indian gaming history.

The latest numbers show many tribal gaming operations have found ways to rebound from the pandemic.

The calculations are from financial statements from 510 gaming operations owned by 243 federally recognized tribes in 29 states.

More details on www.nigc.gov.

 

Get National Native News delivered to your inbox daily. Sign up for our newsletter today.

Pages

Subscribe to Cleveland American Indian Movement aggregator - LATEST GLOBAL INDIGENOUS NEWS