LAND RIGHTS

Chiapas Media Project (C.M.P.)

Founded in 1998, Chiapas Media Project was an award-winning partnership to enable marginalized indigenous communities in Southern Mexico to create their own media by providing video equipment and training. CMP collaborated closely with autonomous Zapatista communities, and in particular, with indigenous youth with little to no formal education. Often working without reliable electricity, these communities have produced videos on women's collectives, autonomous education, agricultural collectives, fair trade coffee, traditional healing and their history of struggle.

Guatemalan Youth in Defense of Land and Life!

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Youth activists speak about defense of land and the environment in Guatemala.

This fall, NISGUA (Network in Solidarity with Guatemala) welcomes Alex Escobar Prado as the featured speaker for this year’s tour, “Guatemalan Youth in Defense of Land and Life!” Alex is an activist, educator, and a member of the Guatemalan environmental justice organization Youth Organized in Defense of Life (JODVID).

Event Time & Date:
October 12, 2017 - 7:15pm to 8:30pm
Event Sponsor
Santa Elena Project of Accompaniment (SEPA)

Events for October 2016

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Ohio Historical Society is seeking a Project Manager for possible World Heritage sites in Ohio. Many sites like Serpent Mound and other so-called "Hopewell" sites will be included, and as World Heritage sites they will receive much attention, money, and tourism. As this project is being negotiated, having a Native person or an ally at the helm could ensure that indigenous perspectives are given more weight. Please pass this along to anyone you know who might be interested.

November 9, 1969. Repossession of Alcatraz Island

Fourteen American Indian activists re-occupy Alcatraz Island in San Francisco Bay and symbolically reclaim the island for Indian people, offering to purchase the island for $24 worth of glass beads and red cloth. On November 20, the symbolic dissent on Alcatraz Island turns into a full-scale re-occupation that lasts until June 11, 1971. One hundred Indian youth, primarily California college students, representing 20 tribes occupy Alcatraz Island and demand the establishment of a center for Native studies, and centers for American Indian spirituality, ecology, and training.

March 8, 1970. Re-occupation of Fort Lawton

American Indian Movement activists join with local Seattle-area Native activists and members of "Indians of All Tribes" to re-enter Fort Lawton, an active U.S. Army Reserve base in northwest Seattle, on March 8, 1970. Federal authorities serve eviction notices to the activists. The U.S. Army then takes 78 Indians into custody following the group’s second attempt to repossess Fort Lawton on March 15, 1970. Government officials identify Indians whom they consider to be leaders and agitators from the March 8 occupation and arraign these Natives before a federal commissioner.

April 2, 1970. Re-occupation of Fort Lawton

American Indian Movement activists join with local Seattle-area Native activists and members of "Indians of All Tribes" to storm the east gate at Fort Lawton, an active U.S. Army Reserve base in northwest Seattle, and re-enter the post. April 2 is the same date scheduled for the preliminary hearings of the Indian activists who attempted to repossess Fort Lawton on March 8 and March 15. Fifteen more American Indian activists are arrested and held for arraignment, including activists from the earlier repossession of Alcatraz Island. Charges against the group are later dismissed.

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