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Senate candidate is all Trump when it comes to a border wall

INDIAN COUNTRY MEDIA NETWORK - April 18, 2019 - 7:00am

Gavin Clarkson, Choctaw, announces bid for the U.S. Senate in New Mexico. He is the first Republican to enter that race #NativeVote20

Categories: UNITED STATES

The storm over Winnipeg's Whiteout and why words matter

CBC ABORIGINAL NEWS - April 18, 2019 - 6:00am
Jets whiteout

Don't abolish the Winnipeg Jets Whiteout parties, says linguistics professor Nicole Rosen — but consider other names that mean exactly the same thing, but have less potential for unwanted undertones.

Categories: CANADA

Nunavut man says heavy burden lifted after determining location of mother's grave

CBC ABORIGINAL NEWS - April 18, 2019 - 5:00am
Jack Anawak 2019

A federal database helping connect Inuit with family members lost under federal tuberculosis policies in the mid-20th century has helped Jack Anawak, a well-known former Nunavut politician, determine where his mother is buried.

Categories: CANADA

Cronkite News: City seeks federal aid to deal with large influx of migrants

INDIANZ.COM - April 18, 2019 - 1:36am
Federal officials have dropped off nearly 1,300 migrants in the city of Yuma, Arizona.
Categories: UNITED STATES

Sault Ste. Marie Tribe becomes second to legalize marijuana in Michigan

INDIANZ.COM - April 18, 2019 - 1:12am
Adult citizens of the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians can use marijuana and grow small amounts under a new law.
Categories: UNITED STATES

Cherokee Nation Fights Opioid Misuse through Education, Prevention Programs

NATIVE KNOT - April 18, 2019 - 1:00am

TAHLEQUAH, Okla. — Cherokee Nation Behavioral Health is making an impact on Cherokee families with programs that focus on education, prevention, and medication-assisted recovery to end opioid misuse in Indian Country.



“Our main goal is to use science in action to reach into our communities and show those struggling with addiction that there is a way out and their family and friends that there is hope,” said Juli Skinner, Cherokee Nation Behavioral Health clinic administrator. “We’re already seeing shifts of attitude and access within our target communities and clinics.”


The behavioral health team works with community groups, local law enforcement, Cherokee Nation Health Services, and area schools to help educate about the misuse of opioids and the proper use and storage of them, as well as offer community-wide drug take-back events and a variety of counseling and support services.


“It’s just as much about preventing misuse and abuse as it is stopping an overdose,” said Sam Bradshaw, director of Cherokee Nation Prevention. “We are currently pioneering tribal medication-assisted recovery practices and continue to support safe solutions for opioid storage and disposal within our network of communities.”


Since 2014, the tribe has received more than $7 million in grant funding from sources like the Indian Health Service Department of Health and Human Services and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration (SAMSHA). Those multiyear grants helped to start six key programs, including the Community Action Network (CAN), Cherokee Nation Tribal Opioid Response (TOR), Think SMART Oklahoma, Restoring Lives Network, Drug-free Communities, and Project HOPE.


“The programs we’ve developed are evidence-based practices and include activities like peer-to-peer training for law enforcement and other first responders to use a life-saving opioid overdose antidote called naloxone,” Bradshaw said. “We distribute Narcan, a nasal spray form of naloxone, to first responder agencies who attend our trainings, and we also resupply them as the need arises.”


In addition to the key programs, behavioral health officials have also worked closely on projects like the Cherokee Nation Opioid Task Force, the Hepatitis-C Elimination Project and the medication-assisted opioid treatment expansion.


“Opioid addiction doesn’t look like what you would think,” Bradshaw said. “It’s our mothers, fathers, aunts, uncles, siblings, cousins and our children. Increasing awareness of the effects this drug has on the individual and the community, as well as access to services to provide help, is the best way to fight this crisis.”


To learn more about the Community Action Network and their work to end opioid misuse in a community near you, visit www.thinksmartok.org/our-partners.


For more information about opioid addiction assistance, contact Cherokee Nation Behavioral Health and Prevention at 918-207-4977.


Categories: UNITED STATES

Students protest TU restructuring plans

NATIVE KNOT - April 18, 2019 - 1:00am

TULSA -- Major backlash is coming from University of Tulsa students after officials announced the restructuring of their academics, which eliminates nearly 40 percent of their programs.


"The trust that we have as students with TU is completely gone," said Megan Lowry, senior studying sociology at TU.


Dozens of TU students filed in Collins Hall Tuesday afternoon, united in their disagreement with the university's decision to eliminate several programs.


"I came to this school because of the arts, I came for their reputation for the arts," said Scott Clayton, a musical theater major at TU.


The restructuring plan announced last week cut majors like musical theater, music performance, history, philosophy, and language minors like Latin and Russian.


"We’ve had off-campus individuals coming and being like yeah we need poetry people in big corporations and we need people who speak different languages," said Tori Gellman, a creative writing major at TU.


Dr. Gerard Clancy, President of TU, says these decisions were made after nearly a year of research, looking at what programs had low enrollment and fewer job opportunities after graduation.


"It’s really important for universities to have a greater focus on the areas where they think the students will want to get in to," said Dr. Clancy.


Dr. Clancy says as expected, the students have been professional while protesting these decisions.


"I knew it would be hard, I knew people would have strong emotions about it, but this is very much trying to look at the long term viability of the university," said Dr. Clancy.


Students say their efforts don't end with a single protest.


"Not only to fight for now but fight for students of five to ten years from now as well as everyone who’s going to be graduating soon," said Jay Redfearn, a freshman at TU.


Students plan on holding a mock funeral for the programs being cut on Friday at TU. They also started an online petition which has more than 2,000 signatures and counting.


For more information on the plan, you can visit their website.

Categories: UNITED STATES

Native Credit Unions Provide Needed Services for Tribal Communities

NATIVE KNOT - April 18, 2019 - 1:00am

Native credit unions, especially those that are certified as community development financial institutions (CDFIs), “offer the broadest array of products and services focused on the individual needs of low-income and underserved consumers,” according to Nikki Pieratos, project director at the Center for Indian Country Development.


According to the Minneapolis Federal Reserve, there are 15 native-owned credit unions with total assets reaching nearly $300 million. Six of these credit unions qualify as CDFIs. Although there aren’t many native credit unions, they have been growing steadily over the last decade. Since 2010, three new Native American federal credit unions have opened their doors.



  • Lakota Federal Credit Union (chartered in 2012);

  • Northern Eagle Federal Credit Union (chartered in 2013); and

  • Seneca Nation of Indians Federal Credit Union (chartered in 2015).


Like other native-serving financial institutions, native credit unions provide vital services to local communities. One common benefit is that native serving financial institutions of all stripes, including banks and credit unions, reduce the number of people who are credit-invisible (i.e. those without a credit score). Nevertheless, each type of financial institution offers different services.


In her study, Pieratos reviews 12 popular financial services, including checking accounts, credit builder loans, technical assistance to business owners, and financial education. (NAFSA also offers a free financial literacy program, which you can check out here.)


Piertos finds that native credit unions, especially those that are certified as CDFIs, offer the most services of any financial institution. As you can see in the chart below, credit union CDFIs offer all financial services except mortgage loans (which is why it is so important to have a diverse group of native financial institutions serving local communities).


Native credit unions also provide many of their services at a lower cost to customers than other financial institutions, partly because they have lower capital requirements and operational costs than their bank counterparts. The vast number of financial services that native credit unions offer at such low costs provide tremendous benefit to their customers.


Native credit unions’ “community-focused governance structure and mission positions them as an important option for improving financial outcomes in Native communities, especially those with higher proportions of low-income and underserved populations,” said Pieratos. “There is a strong relationship between low access to financial services and lack of upward economic mobility. By helping to close financial services gaps, Native CUs are increasing mobility, and facilitating greater levels of homeownership and small business development in Native communities.”


Categories: UNITED STATES

What Makes Casino Gaming a Top Form of Online Entertainment

NATIVE KNOT - April 18, 2019 - 1:00am

The entertainment industry is a vast one. Ranging from creative programs to gaming online, the entertainment realm is continuously growing and impressively so. In 2019, statistics have shown, online casino gambling has fast risen to steal the majority of online users utilizing the internet on a daily basis. It has become so popular, people have opted to join online casinos rather than land-based casino establishments. Why is this? What makes casino gaming one of the most popular forms of online entertainment? We sent our researchers in to go investigate and this is what they returned with.


Sign Up Bonuses


The best online casino site will offer something that land-based casinos cannot; a sign-up bonus or otherwise known as a welcome bonus. A sign-up bonus is an incentive usually offered by all of the most popular online casinos and usually required a player to enjoy free spins, casino credits or a combination of the two. This sign up bonus is often tied up to terms and conditions but most online players are well aware of the fact and still choose to sign up using a bonus.


Free Casino Games


Yes, this is actually a thing. Online casino gambling is the only place where you can access all the greatest casino games from your mobile device or your PC. This has been a great incentive for players looking to expand their gaming selection and not have to blow money through the learning process.


Mobile Access


You can access your favorite casino games via your mobile device which grants you instant access around the clock. It’s a popular form of gaming since players are usually on their mobile phones most of the day and to quickly access their games, well this is now possible through mobile access.


Promotional Offers


If sign up bonuses isn’t enough to keep you as a member of your latest online casino, then maybe the promotional offers will be. Promotional offers include deals which feature discounted rates, bonus codes, loyalty points and programs. These offers are often changed up to keep players entertained and loyal.


VIP Membership


Online casinos offer VIP memberships to high roller customers. These exclusive rewards include some of the most incredible rewards ever obtained, some of which you would never find at a land-based casino establishment. For example, you could win weekend vacations at top casino resorts or travel destinations, you have access to your own personal casino banker and you collect points for incredible discounted deals.


Online entertainment has been attracting new users across the world and uniting them in a world of discovery. While there are other online users utilizing the internet for more productive reasons, we have to say we much prefer using the internet for entertainment purposes! Check out some of the world’s best online casinos to discover what it is about online gaming that draws you in, is it the money, the fun factor or is it all of the above?!

Categories: UNITED STATES

San Francisco Bay American Indian Demand Answers in Death of Native Woman

NATIVE KNOT - April 18, 2019 - 1:00am

SAN FRANCISCO — On April 6th, 2019, Jessica Nicole Alva passed away in the San Francisco General Neuro-ICU unit after being in a coma for four days, as a result of an abusive domestic relationship.  Her partner was picked up on a parole violation but released soon thereafter.


Alva’s family and members of the American Indian community are upset with the way the San Francisco Police Department (SFPD) handled the case. They maintain the SFPD did not thoroughly investigate the crime scene and simply took the word of her partner that she attempted suicide, although there was a history of domestic violence, as well as visible signs of abuse on her body.


Yesterday, Missing & Murdered Indigenous Women advocates went to the San Francisco District Attorney’s office voice their concern and demand the office open an investigation into the wrongful death of Alva.


Sovereign Bodies Institute, a community-based center for research on gender and sexual violence against Indigenous peoples, and the home for the Missing & Murdered Indigenous Women’s Database, issued the following statement yesterday at a press conference:


As an organization headquartered in Northern California, with many staff and partners in the Bay Area, we are disturbed and outraged by the San Francisco Police Department’s response to the death of Jessica Alva.


Jessica was a loving mother. Based on our data, Indigenous mothers are nearly two times more likely to be murdered than other Indigenous women who go missing or are killed. There are thousands of children across Indian Country who have been forced to grow up without their mothers, due to this violence, without any additional supports or programming to account for the effects of this loss; we are deeply saddened to know that Jessica’s children will now experience this as well.


Jessica was a member of the Bay Area Native American community and was Indigenous to Northern California. She is now one of 135 MMIWG cases we have identified across the state, over 75% of which occurred in Northern California. Her story is one of the many that make California one of the states among the top 5 with the highest number of MMIWG cases, alongside Washington, New Mexico, Arizona, and Montana.

Categories: UNITED STATES

Application Period Now Open for Third Year of Native American Language-Immersion Grants

NATIVE NEWS ONLINE - April 18, 2019 - 12:40am

Ojibwa Anthony Roy keeping Native lanuage alive in Chicago

Published April 18, 2019

Deadline is May 30, 2019

LONGMONT, Colo, — First Nations Development Institute (First Nations) today launched a Request for Proposals (RFP) process for its Native Language Immersion Initiative (NLII). First Nations will award about 12 grants of up to $90,000 each to build the capacity of and directly support Native language-immersion programs. The application deadline is May 30, 2019.

This RFP is for the third year of this three-year initiative. The first-year RFP was launched early in 2018, the second in October 2018, and now this one for the third year. The grant period for this new RFP will run from July 15, 2019, to July 14, 2020.

Under NLII, First Nations is seeking to build a dialogue and community of practice, through the grantee cohorts, around Native language immersion programs, and momentum for supporting Native language programs. The effort is made possible through funding from the National Endowment for the HumanitiesLannan FoundationKalliopeia Foundation and NoVo Foundation. The initiative includes American Indian, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian language programs.

The full RFP can be found here: https://www.firstnations.org/rfps/nlii2019-2020/. It contains information on eligibility, the application process, grant requirements, selection criteria, allowable activities and more.  Eligibility is limited to U.S.-based tribal government programs, tribal 7871 entities, Native-controlled nonprofit organizations, and Native-controlled community organizations with a fiscal sponsor.

Further, there will be two free Q&A webinars for applicants to learn more about the RFP process and eligibility. Participation in these webinars is not mandatory, but applicants are strongly urged to register for and attend one or both of them.

There are currently about 150 Native languages spoken in the U.S., many of them spoken only by a small number of elders. Without intervention, many of these languages are expected to become extinct within the next 50 to 100 years, which means a significant loss of cultural heritage. These grants can support activities such as curriculum development, language and culture summer and after-school camps, professional development, mentorships, internships, leadership succession planning, and the strengthening of technological and informational systems. Language retention and revitalization programs have been recognized as providing key benefits to Native American communities by boosting educational achievement and student retention rates. They also support community identity, Native systems of kinship, and management of community, cultural and natural resources.

Through this initiative, First Nations seeks to stem the loss of Indigenous languages and cultures by supporting new generations of Native American language speakers, and establishing infrastructure and models for Native language-immersion programs that may be replicated in other communities. To learn more about the history and current grantees of this initiative, go here.

The post Application Period Now Open for Third Year of Native American Language-Immersion Grants appeared first on Native News Online.

Categories: UNITED STATES

Northern Manitoba First Nation celebrates return of NHL hero Brady Keeper

CBC ABORIGINAL NEWS - April 18, 2019 - 12:24am
Keeper 1

Northern Manitoba's newest hockey hero received a welcome usually reserved for a Stanley Cup champion, even though his team didn't even qualify for the playoffs.

Categories: CANADA

Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) 2019 Commencement Keynote Address to be Delivered by Noted Sculptor and Contemporary Pueblo Artist Roxanne Swentzell

NATIVE NEWS ONLINE - April 18, 2019 - 12:02am

Roxanne Swentzwell – Photo by Jason Ordaz. Courtesy of IAIA.

Published April 18, 2019

SANTA FE, N.M. — Roxanne Swentzell (Santa Clara Pueblo) has been selected to give the Institute of American Indian Arts’ 2019 commencement address at 11:00 am on Saturday, May 18, 2019.  The Commencement Ceremony will be held in the Dance Circle on the IAIA Campus, — 83 Avan Nu Po Road, on the South Side of Santa Fe — just minutes from the intersection of Rodeo Road and Richards Avenue. For directions and a map of the campus click here. The public is welcome to attend. 

A complimentary luncheon will follow. In addition to delivering the commencement address, Swentzell will also be awarded anHonorary Doctorate of Humanities degree during the ceremony. Previous recipients of the IAIA Honorary Doctor of Humanities Degree have included notable persons such as George Rivera (Pojoaque Pueblo), Dan Namingha (Hopi-Tewa), Kevin Red Star (Crow), Suzan Harjo   (Cheyenne/Hodulgee Muscogee), James Luna (Luiseño), N. Scott Momaday (Kiowa), Tony Abeyta (Navajo), Dave Warren (Santa Clara Pueblo), David Bradley (Minnesota Chippewa Tribe), and Linda Lomahaftewa (Hopi/Choctaw). Roxanne Swentzell was born on December 9, 1962 in Taos, New Mexico. She loved art from an early age. As a child, Swentzell struggled with a speech impediment that prevented her from communicating. Unable to articulate her emotions through words she began to make miniature figures in clay to convey her feelings. The sculptures she created as a means to express herself to others continues to be her primary artistic medium. While still in high school, Swentzell attended the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and completed the program in 1979. The descendant of a long line of the talented potters of the Santa Clara Pueblo, Swentzell grew up with customary methods of Pueblo pottery making. She watched her mother harvesting clay then hand-coiling and pit-firing pots. She learned from an early age how to dig, mix, and process her own clay. After her two years at IAIA, Swentzell attended Portland’s Museum Art School in 1980. She left after one year. While Swentzell’s formal education ended with her departure from The Portland Museum Art School, Swentzell does not consider that the end of her education. Swentzell has said that: “Every day is an amazing new book, a test in every discipline, a chance to advance myself, and great times on the playground.” This philosophy is reflected in her decision to home school her two children — daughter Rose Bean Simpsonwho followed in the family practice of making art — she’s a graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design, and also earned an MFA in Creative Writing from IAIA. Her son, Porter Swentzell, is the Chair of the Indigenous Liberal Studies Department at IAIA and a newly-appointed regent for Northern New Mexico College. Of this experience, Roxanne has commented that raising and home schooling her children was an education for her as well. Swentzell’s clay sculptures have moved and delighted audiences around the world. Her artistic endeavors have won Swentzell numerous awards since her early twenties. Swentzell’s first public exhibit was at the annual Santa Fe Indian Market in 1984; two years later she won a total of eight awards for her sculpture and pottery at the same event. In 1994, Swentzell also won the Market’s Creative Excellence in Sculpture award. Swentzell’s work combines personal and society commentary and reflects a deep respect for the earth, family, and cultural heritage. Her sculptures have shown at the White House in Washington, DC and in galleries and museums worldwide. Some of her permanent installations are at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American IndianCartier in Paris, the Santa Fe Convention Center, and the Museum of Wellington in New Zealand. In addition to her art, Swentzell farms her own land to provide self-sustenance. Swentzell is the Co-Founder and President of the nonprofit Flowering Tree Permaculture Institute created in 1987 at the Santa Clara Pueblo. Flowering Tree is an organization that is based on the theory of ecological design which seeks to build sustainable human living and agriculture. The Institute provides lessons on different techniques and methods for healthy living. Swentzell’s work with the Institute reflects her dedication to nurturing the Earth and sustaining its resources. To further her work with the Institute, and to her own personal philosophy, Swentzell looks to her ancestors as examples of preservers and protectors of the earth. Her concerns extend not only to preserving the earth but topreserving the indigenous knowledge of conservation. She initiated the Pueblo Food Experience, in which participants only ate foods available to pre-contact Tewa people.

IAIA President Dr. Robert Martin (Cherokee) commented “it is an incredible honor for IAIA and our 2019 graduating class for Roxanne to join us on this day of celebration to deliver the commencement address.  Also, the awarding of an honorary doctorate will provide an opportunity for IAIA to acknowledge and express our admiration to one of our alumna for her outstanding contributions to IAIA, Native arts and cultures, New Mexico, and the nation”.

To stream the event on-line, please visit  www.iaia.edu/commencement on the morning of commencement.

 

The post Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) 2019 Commencement Keynote Address to be Delivered by Noted Sculptor and Contemporary Pueblo Artist Roxanne Swentzell appeared first on Native News Online.

Categories: UNITED STATES

Native American Journalist Patty Loew Elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences

NATIVE NEWS ONLINE - April 18, 2019 - 12:01am

Patty Loew

Published April 18, 2019

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — American Indian journalist Patty Loew, a tribal citizen of the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Ojibwe, has been elected as a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, one of the nation’s oldest and most prestigious honorary societies.

Loew is professor in the Medill School of Journalism, Media, Integrated Marketing Communications and co-director of the Center for Native American and Indigenous Research at Northwestern University (CNAIR).

At CNAIR, she helps advance research and scholarship about Native nations, communities and people. Loew is author of “Indian Nations of Wisconsin: Histories of Endurance and Renewal,” now in its second edition, which won the Wisconsin Library Association’s 2002 Outstanding Book Award.

The Academy was founded in 1780 by John Adams, James Bowdoin and others who believed the new republic should honor exceptionally accomplished individuals and engage them in advancing the public good. The Academy’s dual mission remains essentially the same 239 years later with honorees from increasingly diverse fields and with the work now focused on the arts, democracy, education, global affairs and science.

Loew is among five individuals from Northwestern University to be elected this year. Additionally, this year’s class includes more than 200 individuals with compelling achievements in academic, business, government and public affairs. Perhaps, the most notable name among the more than 200 is former First Lady of the United States, Michelle Obama.

The new class will be inducted at a ceremony in October 2019 in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

 

The post Native American Journalist Patty Loew Elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences appeared first on Native News Online.

Categories: UNITED STATES

Cherokee Nation Fights Opioid Misuse through Education, Prevention Programs

NATIVE NEWS ONLINE - April 18, 2019 - 12:00am

Published April 18, 2019

TAHLEQUAH, Okla. — Cherokee Nation Behavioral Health is making an impact on Cherokee families with programs that focus on education, prevention and medication-assisted recovery to end opioid misuse in Indian Country.

“Our main goal is to use science in action to reach into our communities and show those struggling with addiction that there is a way out and their family and friends that there is hope,” said Juli Skinner, Cherokee Nation Behavioral Health clinic administrator. “We’re already seeing shifts of attitude and access within our target communities and clinics.”

The behavioral health team works with community groups, local law enforcement, Cherokee Nation Health Services and area schools to help educate about the misuse of opioids and the proper use and storage of them, as well as offer community-wide drug take-back events and a variety of counseling and support services.

“It’s just as much about preventing misuse and abuse as it is stopping an overdose,” said Sam Bradshaw, director of Cherokee Nation Prevention. “We are currently pioneering tribal medication-assisted recovery practices and continue to support safe solutions for opioid storage and disposal within our network of communities.”

Since 2014, the tribe has received more than $7 million in grant funding from sources like the Indian Health Service Department of Health and Human Services and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration (SAMSHA). Those multiyear grants helped start six key programs, including the Community Action Network (CAN), Cherokee Nation Tribal Opioid Response (TOR), Think SMART Oklahoma, Restoring Lives Network, Drug-free Communities and Project HOPE.

“The programs we’ve developed are evidence-based practices and include activities like peer-to-peer trainings for law enforcement and other first responders to use a lifesaving opioid overdose antidote called naloxone,” Bradshaw said. “We distribute Narcan, a nasal spray form of naloxone, to first responder agencies who attend our trainings, and we also resupply them as the need arises.”

In addition to the key programs, behavioral health officials have also worked closely on projects like the Cherokee Nation Opioid Task Force, the Hepatitis-C Elimination Project and the medication-assisted opioid treatment expansion.

“Opioid addiction doesn’t look like what you would think,” Bradshaw said. “It’s our mothers, fathers, aunts, uncles, siblings, cousins and our children. Increasing awareness of the effects this drug has on the individual and the community, as well as access to services to provide help, is the best way to fight this crisis.”

To learn more about the Community Action Network and their work to end opioid misuse in a community near you, visit www.thinksmartok.org/our-partners.

For more information about opioid addiction assistance, contact Cherokee Nation Behavioral Health and Prevention at 918-207-4977.

The post Cherokee Nation Fights Opioid Misuse through Education, Prevention Programs appeared first on Native News Online.

Categories: UNITED STATES

Distractions You Should Stay Away From

NATIVE NEWS ONLINE - April 18, 2019 - 12:00am

Published April 18, 2019

It is easy to get distracted. People love to get distracted most of the time. The primary reason here is that people enjoy distractions more than the task they are given to. While distractions can help us in some cases, there are some distractions we should stay away from.

In this post, we’ll talk about the distractions you should keep yourself away from. Remember that these distractions will ruin your life and make your life miserable. So, have a look at them and stay away from them, to the extent possible.

1. Smartphones

Smartphones are good for us in many ways, but it can turn out to be problematic for us many ways too. Remember that a number of things can be handled without a smartphone but the reasons for which it is considered to be a distraction cannot be avoided. The smartphone is often considered to be a reason because of which we do not find enough time for our loved ones, do not create many family moments, and do not finish our tasks on time. This is often annoying for people, and if these reasons are not good enough for you to agree on, we’d like to remind you of the fact that we spend a lot of time with our smartphones, ensuring that the same is always charged and in good condition. There are numerous reasons for us to believe that smartphones can distract us at any given point of time and should not be with us at all times.

2. The urge of buying something new every now and then

It is often considered to be annoying if we do not get to buy something we like. However, if we make it our habit and keep buying something every now and then, we’ll end up losing all our wealth, and it will be difficult for us to keep ourselves out of financial problems. This is an issue to be considered with all the seriousness, and if you’re not worrying about it today, you’ll have a lot to regret about later on. So, we hope you’ll make constant attempts to make sure that you control your urge to buy something every now and then. This is not an easy thing to consider, and if you’re not opting for the right solution, you’ll be disappointed with yourself later on. There are many things to talk about in this case, and you should look into it right away. Controlling your urge to buy something every now and then will save you a fortune.

3. Affairs

This is one thing that should be avoided for sure. After marriage, you should not think of being with another person. You’re legally married, and you’ll still find people who would want to complicate your life in a number of ways. Make sure you do not fall prey to the tricks opted for by others and try not to have an affair with anyone after marriage. This will only make it difficult for you to lead a happy and peaceful life. If you do not want it to have a negative impact on your life, simply stay away from it.

4. Expensive shopping list

We all love expensive items available in the market, and we agree that buying luxury items like Rolex air king is a good investment, but making it a habit to buy expensive items every time is not a smart thing to do. We’d suggest that you should look into your shopping list and check which of the expensive buys should stay and which ones can be scrapped off the list. You have a choice to make, and we’re sure that you’ll make the right choice.

The post Distractions You Should Stay Away From appeared first on Native News Online.

Categories: UNITED STATES

Indian Country Today E-Weekly Newsletter for April 17, 2019

INDIAN COUNTRY MEDIA NETWORK - April 17, 2019 - 9:12pm

‘Shock and dismay’ for Notre Dame - so should it be for Chaco Canyon, Medicaid and Montana, Bay Mills legalizes marijuana and more

Categories: UNITED STATES

Michael R.L. Begay of IAIA Wins TCJ Student Best Film Award

TRIBAL COLLEGE JOURNAL - April 17, 2019 - 6:32pm

Tribal College Journal has announced that Michael R.L. Begay of the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) is the recipient of the 2019 TCJ Student Best Film Award for his original work,

Read more ›

The post Michael R.L. Begay of IAIA Wins TCJ Student Best Film Award appeared first on Tribal College Journal of American Indian Higher Education.

Categories: EDUCATION, UNITED STATES

IAIA’s Red Quilt Solidarity Project Created to Support Missing/Murdered Indigenous Women

TRIBAL COLLEGE JOURNAL - April 17, 2019 - 6:26pm

The Red Quilt Solidarity Project is an international awareness initiative dedicated to missing/murdered Indigenous women (MMIW). While the numbers of unreported, unsolved, and uninvestigated cases of MMIW are astounding,

Read more ›

The post IAIA’s Red Quilt Solidarity Project Created to Support Missing/Murdered Indigenous Women appeared first on Tribal College Journal of American Indian Higher Education.

Categories: EDUCATION, UNITED STATES

‘The Horse Nation Is Here for Us’: How Lakota Culture Is Helping Treat Child Trauma in South Dakota

TRIBAL COLLEGE JOURNAL - April 17, 2019 - 6:23pm

Then, in 2013, faculty at Sinte Gleska University reached out to him about returning to his family ranching roots and starting this program, called Tiwahe Glu Kini Pi ("Bringing the Family Back to Life"), with some horses donated by local ranchers.

The post ‘The Horse Nation Is Here for Us’: How Lakota Culture Is Helping Treat Child Trauma in South Dakota appeared first on Tribal College Journal of American Indian Higher Education.

Categories: EDUCATION, UNITED STATES

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