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Life in Defiance: Nations That Survived Mass Extermination Attempts

NATIVE NEWS ONLINE - May 21, 2019 - 12:00am
Guest Commentary

Genocide is a tragedy that never truly stops. You can see this clearly by observing the peoples descended from the survivors of genocides today. They do not thrive, because it’s impossible to just “bounce back” from a tragedy of this magnitude. They haven’t become stronger for it, because there can never be anything even remotely “positive” in the consequences of genocide. But they do live and bear the burden of past horrors on their shoulders through generations.

Nations That Survived Genocides Today: Is There Hope for the Future?

Any discussion of genocide includes the Holocaust in one way or another because it is considered to be the biggest and therefore most disastrous genocide in history. This statement is hard to argue when you consider that this genocide resulted in over 6 million dead and was accompanied by various horrifying atrocities that one can learn more about in the Holocaust Museum. There is no denying the fact that this was an unspeakable tragedy that had an immense impact on the world as a whole.

However, it’s imperative to understand that every genocide is this way. There can be no “contest” about which of these atrocities was worse because all of them are equally devastating. Controlled and methodical eradication of peoples is the vilest of crimes. Tragically, it has been repeated dozens of times throughout human history.

What’s even more tragic is that many of these tragedies are overlooked today, which means their lessons are forgotten. It also needs to be mentioned that many people today seem more focused on definitions than the tragedies behind them. The debate about whether the deaths of over 4.5 million Native Americans during the colonization period can be considered a genocide is a vivid example of that (Oxford Academic). Arguing over terminology does not change the fact that those people are dead and that their descendants are discriminated against still.

What matters is the reoccurring theme of the peoples, who have already been targeted and suffered from the unspeakable horror of mass extermination, being targeted and ostracized even years and centuries after those tragic events. Those who have had to struggle with this include, but are by no means limited to:

This list can go on and on, and the worst thing about it is that you can identify the nations that went through that nightmare today because the tensions are still there. And that shouldn’t be a surprise considering the fact that dehumanization and propaganda are both essential factors for the creation of genocide.

This means that for such a tragedy to happen in the first place, the population of the country where it happens must be “brainwashed” into hating a group of people. That is no regular backyard brawl type of hatred at play here. The feeling incited by the governments that initiate genocides must be so strong and consuming that mass extermination is seen as an “acceptable solution”. It’s imperative to understand that genocides aren’t opposed not out of fear but because the propaganda helps brainwash the rest of the population into seeing them as a form of deliverance.

And that is the true horror of genocides. This is also the reason why the targeted people are ostracized decades past. Because hatred like this, it doesn’t die. It gets passed on through generations and sets the ground for a repeat of the tragedy.

The question now is can this circle of hatred be broken?

The post Life in Defiance: Nations That Survived Mass Extermination Attempts appeared first on Native News Online.

Categories: UNITED STATES

'The most exciting sport you'll ever see': Indian relay takes off in northern Alberta

CBC ABORIGINAL NEWS - May 20, 2019 - 8:30pm
Bonnyville Indian relay

Thousands of animated fans watched daredevil riders at Bonnyville’s rodeo grounds, during an inaugural Indian relay race over the May long weekend.

Categories: CANADA

U.S. Supreme Court Rules in Favor of American Indian Hunting Rights

NATIVE NEWS ONLINE - May 20, 2019 - 6:49pm

U.S. Supreme Court – Native News Online photo by Levi Rickert

Published May 20, 2019

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Supreme ruled in favor of American Indian hunting rights on Monday. In a close 5-4 decision, the Court ruled hunting rights for the Crow tribe under a 19th-century treaty did not expire when Wyoming became a state.

The Supreme Court ruled in favor of Clayvin Herrera, affirming that the Crow Tribe’s hunting rights under the 1868 Treaty of Fort Laramie remain valid.

Justice Neil Gorsuch, one more time, demonstrated he understands American Indian rights and treaties.

In response to today’s ruling in Herrera v. Wyoming, the following statement is by Lillian Alvernaz, Indigenous Justice Legal Fellow with the ACLU of Montana:

“This ruling is a huge win for Clayvin Herrera, the Crow Tribe and tribes across the country that entered into treaties with the federal government. On a practical level, this means that members of the Crow Tribe can continue to hunt on unoccupied lands like the Bighorn National Forest to provide sustenance for their families and children. This is especially important for the well-being and health of the Tribe because access to healthy food on the reservation is limited. More broadly, through this decision, the Supreme Court held the federal government accountable to its treaty obligations and affirmed tribal sovereignty.  Throughout the history of colonization, tribes have upheld their end of treaties while the federal government has consistently fallen short of its obligations.  We’re hopeful that this ruling marks a new day, one where the federal government lives up to its treaty obligations and recommits to the important principles of tribal sovereignty and self-determination of tribes in the United States.”

 

 

 

The post U.S. Supreme Court Rules in Favor of American Indian Hunting Rights appeared first on Native News Online.

Categories: UNITED STATES

Ranger Loney: Leech Lake’s Valedictorian Hopes to Work at Chippewa National Forest

TRIBAL COLLEGE JOURNAL - May 20, 2019 - 4:43pm

The 20-year-old class valedictorian is set to graduate from the tribal college today with a forest ecology degree. From there, it's on to Salish Kootenai College in Pablo, Mont., for a four-year degree and, maybe one day, a district ranger post at the Chippewa National Forest near Walker, his hometown.

The post Ranger Loney: Leech Lake’s Valedictorian Hopes to Work at Chippewa National Forest appeared first on Tribal College Journal of American Indian Higher Education.

Categories: EDUCATION, UNITED STATES

Navajo Technical University Confers First Honorary Doctoral Degree to John Pinto

TRIBAL COLLEGE JOURNAL - May 20, 2019 - 4:42pm

The ceremony on Friday included the university bestowing its first honorary doctoral degree to state Sen. John Pinto. The 94-year-old held the honorary Doctor of Public Service degree after it was given to him by NTU President Elmer Guy.

The post Navajo Technical University Confers First Honorary Doctoral Degree to John Pinto appeared first on Tribal College Journal of American Indian Higher Education.

Categories: EDUCATION, UNITED STATES

LCO College President States Big Achievements, Goals at Investiture

TRIBAL COLLEGE JOURNAL - May 20, 2019 - 4:41pm

Dr. Russell Swagger, the ninth president at Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwa Community College, spoke at his Ceremony of Investiture on Friday, May 10, culminating in a week of events.

The post LCO College President States Big Achievements, Goals at Investiture appeared first on Tribal College Journal of American Indian Higher Education.

Categories: EDUCATION, UNITED STATES

Texas Passes Felony Penalties For Pipeline Damage

LAW360 (Native feed) - May 20, 2019 - 4:35pm
The Texas Legislature on Monday passed a bill that would impose felony penalties on those who damage oil and gas pipelines and other so-called critical infrastructure in a move criticized by activists as an attack on free speech.

Yes, cultural appropriation can happen within the Indigenous community and yes, we should be debating it

CBC ABORIGINAL NEWS - May 20, 2019 - 3:51pm
MUSIC Indigenous Awards 20190401

The Inuit artists who spoke out on this issue were characterized as "bringing us back a few steps" – as though dissent should be taken to be inherently regressive.

Categories: CANADA

8th Circ. Won't Revisit Ruling On Tribal Police Immunity

LAW360 (Native feed) - May 20, 2019 - 3:20pm
The Eighth Circuit on Monday rejected a Nebraska man's request that the court revisit its decision to toss his suit alleging thst he was robbed and beaten by Oglala Sioux tribal authorities, leaving in place a circuit panel's ruling that the tribe is immune to the suit.

High Court Won't Review Grand Canyon Uranium Mine Claim

LAW360 (Native feed) - May 20, 2019 - 3:05pm
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to consider a Native American tribe’s argument that the U.S. Forest Service was required under the National Historic Preservation Act to conduct additional reviews for a uranium mining project near the Grand Canyon.

Treaty rights win in Supreme Court

INDIAN COUNTRY MEDIA NETWORK - May 20, 2019 - 2:02pm

Treaties don’t have an expiration date even during statehood as Supreme Court rules a 150-year-old treaty protects Crow Tribe and hunting rights

Categories: UNITED STATES

US Gives No Right To Wilderness, DOJ Says In Climate Suit

LAW360 (Native feed) - May 20, 2019 - 1:38pm
The federal government has asked an Oregon federal judge to toss a lawsuit alleging that U.S. citizens have a constitutional right to privacy in the wilderness that's been violated by climate change-inducing fossil fuel, agriculture and forestry policies.

Tim Giago: Boarding school survivors deserve long overdue compensation

INDIANZ.COM - May 20, 2019 - 12:43pm
I speak as an abused boarding school survivor. I was there; I saw it, I felt it, and I recovered from it.
Categories: UNITED STATES

Supreme Court backs off-reservation treaty rights of Crow Tribe

INDIANZ.COM - May 20, 2019 - 12:38pm
The nation's highest court has once again sided with Indian Country in a treaty rights case.
Categories: UNITED STATES

High Court Won't Weigh In On NLRB's Power Over Tribal Cos.

LAW360 (Native feed) - May 20, 2019 - 12:35pm
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to consider whether the National Labor Relations Board has power over tribal employers, rejecting a California casino’s challenge to a ruling that it illegally blocked workers from passing out pro-union leaflets.

Monday, May 20, 2019

NATIONAL NATIVE NEWS (nativetimes.net) - May 20, 2019 - 12:01pm

Oglala Lakota Olympian Billy Mills speaks at the University of Kansas after receiving an honorary degree. (Photo-Billy Mills, Facebook)

U.S. Supreme Court rules in favor of tribal hunting rights Arizona tribes seek to halt construction of copper mine Lakota Olympian Billy Mills receives honorary KU degree https://www.nativenews.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/nnn052019.mp3

The post Monday, May 20, 2019 appeared first on National Native News, by Antonia Gonzales.

Categories: UNITED STATES

Cherokee Nation chief candidate David Walkingstick fight to stay in race

INDIANZ.COM - May 20, 2019 - 11:43am
Citizens of the Cherokee Nation are choosing a new leader in less than two weeks.
Categories: UNITED STATES

Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences break ground on new medical school

CHEROKEE NATION NEWS (official) - May 20, 2019 - 11:00am
Leaders from the Cherokee Nation and Oklahoma State University Center for Health Sciences gathered in Tahlequah to break ground on the 84,000 square-foot OSU College of Osteopathic Medicine at the Cherokee Nation.
Categories: UNITED STATES

Albert Bender: It's clear to all that Trump has got to go

INDIANZ.COM - May 20, 2019 - 10:51am
Donald Trump has been called almost everything—racist demagogue, vulgar sexist, inept businessman, pathological liar, and moron.
Categories: UNITED STATES

Zoltan Grossman: Cowboys and Indians unite across the country

INDIANZ.COM - May 20, 2019 - 10:23am
By teaming up to defend the place they all call home, 'cowboys and Indians' are protecting their lands and waters for all.
Categories: UNITED STATES

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