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PATROL OFFICER - GREEN BAY POLICE DEPARTMENT

INDIAN COUNTRY NEWS -

The Green Bay Police Department is accepting applications for the position of Patrol Officer.  An eligibility list will be established to fill anticipated vacancies.  The Police Department wants to attract and retain men and women who reflect the diversity of the area, and who are committed to providing law enforcement services with a focus on community oriented policing.  

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Native News Update January 19, 2018

INDIAN COUNTRY NEWS -

This week's stories: Tribes form Native Farm Bill Coalition; Cherokee Nation launches language program for immersion charter school graduates; Tribes investing in health care through joint ventures with IHS; Open call for Native American TV writers lab; “Native America” four-part series to premiere on PBS in the fall.

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Strange Inheritance Episode Features 250,000 Indian Arrowheads Once Denied to John Wayne

INDIAN COUNTRY MEDIA NETWORK -


A North Carolina man by the name of Jerry Williams inherited a collection of nearly 250,000 ancient Indian arrowheads. The collection will be featured on the FOX Business Network series, Strange Inheritance with Jamie Colby, premiering Monday, Jan. 22, at 9 p.m. ET.

As described on the FOX Business Network site, the collection was originally gathered by a North Carolina couple, Moon and Irene Mullins who amassed the relics over a half-century beginning in the 1930’s. Moon Mullins willed the arrowheads to his friend and caregiver Jerry Williams.

The collection has grabbed the attention of Joe Candillo, Native American historian and a member of the Pascua Yaqui tribe. “The Mullins Collection surpasses anything I’ve seen in private hands … It’s breathtaking. You’re just overtaken by the number of arrowheads.”

In the episode, Wayne Underwood, a friend of the North Carolina couple, tells Jamie Colby that Western movie star John Wayne once tried to buy it from Moon. “Not even John Wayne could convince him to part with it. Moon turned him down immediately,” said Underwood.

Underwood said the couple would “hunt all day long. They just loved life and they loved spending it together.” He said they found their biggest hauls on farms and fertile land where tribes built villages, leaving behind artifacts.

FOX Business Network

In the FOX Business Network series episode ‘Strange Inheritance with Jamie Colby,’ Wayne Underwood, tells the host Jamie Colby that the movie star John Wayne once tried to buy the collection of 250,000 arrowheads. The original owner said no immediately.

In 1982, Irene Mullins died at age 69. Jerry Williams and his wife moved in with Moon Mullins to care for him and keep the arrowheads from being lost if Mullins were to go to a resting home. Mullins died in 1987.

Wayne Underwood had hoped to buy the collection from Jerry Williams and his wife, knowing it was worth around a million dollars. But he didn’t have that much money.

Joe Candillo agrees the collection is extremely valuable. “As you go back in time, typically an arrowhead becomes more valuable. Some of the oldest points, my goodness, I have seen those go anywhere from five hundred to a couple thousand dollars.”

Watch the ‘Strange Inheritance: Indian Arrowheads’ preview video here.

Underwood and Williams struck a deal. Underwood agreed to pay one dollar from every ticket sold from his attraction and museum in Blowing Rock, North Carolina, called Mystery Hill for the rest of the couple’s lives. Once Underwood paid $300,000 he would own the collection.

To date, the Williams’ couple have received nearly $400,000 and Underwood is planning a new building to house the collection. Due to new laws making it illegal to take arrowheads from public lands Underwood’s collection may be the largest private collection ever.

 

Indian Country Today’s Vincent Schilling (Akwesasne Mohawk) on Twitter

The post Strange Inheritance Episode Features 250,000 Indian Arrowheads Once Denied to John Wayne appeared first on Indian Country Media Network.

Oklahoma City Theatre Company Announces Open Call For Scripts: Deadline February 15

INDIAN COUNTRY MEDIA NETWORK -


The Oklahoma City Theatre Company has announced an open call for scripts with a deadline of February 15, 2018 for potential inclusion into their ninth annual Native American New Play Festival.  The company welcomes all American Indian, Alaskan Native, Native Hawaiian, Canadian First Nation and Indigenous Mexico playwrights to submit full-length plays written for the stage.

The Oklahoma City Theatre Company’s ninth annual Native American New Play Festival will take place June 7-9 and June 14-16, 2018 in the Oklahoma City Music Hall City Space Theatre.

The Oklahoma City Theatre Company’s 9th annual Native American New Play Festival is calling for full-length scripts written from an indigenous perspective and all themes and topics are welcomed. Though the company says plays may focus on historical or present-day issues, they are especially interested in plays that center on an Oklahoma tribe and tribal history.

The selection process will consider full length plays that are received by February 15, 2018 and will be read and evaluated by a panel comprised of Native American theatrical artists, Oklahoma City Theatre Company staff and community members.

The selection panel will select 2-3 plays for a staged reading during the festival based on originality, theatricality, and execution. One finalist will receive a staged reading with professional actors and a director during the festival and an audience discussion will follow the readings.

A full production will be awarded to one of the finalists from the readings and showcased as the featured production the following festival year, 2019. This year’s featured festival production is “Round Dance” by Arigon Starr (Kickapoo/Muskogee Creek).

Courtesy 'Round Dance' by Arigon Starr is this year's featured Courtesy Oklahoma City Theatre Company

‘Round Dance’ by Arigon Starr is this year’s featured production at the Oklahoma City Theatre Company’s ninth annual Native American New Play Festival.

Submission Guidelines from The Oklahoma City Theatre Company

All submissions must conform to a standard play-script format (one-inch margins, #12 Times or Courier font, all pages numbered). Plays that have had previous workshops and productions within the last five years are welcome.

Please include a production history if applicable. Include a title page with full contact information, (mailing address, phone numbers, email address) a draft or revision date and a character breakdown at the beginning of your script. Please provide a biography of 100 words and provide a photo of at least 300dpi. Please label all attachments as follows: Title of the play Author’s Last Name, First Initial.

To submit, email your submission materials at: mayatorralba@gmail.com

Deadline: February 15, 2018

The company accepts submissions written for the stage by Native American, Alaska Native, Hawaiian, First Nations, and Indigenous Mexico artists.

For more information about the festival, check out www.OKCTC.org  or www.NANPF.org

 

Indian Country Today’s Vincent Schilling (Akwesasne Mohawk) on Twitter

The post Oklahoma City Theatre Company Announces Open Call For Scripts: Deadline February 15 appeared first on Indian Country Media Network.

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