Feed aggregator

Tuesday, November 26, 2019

NATIONAL NATIVE NEWS (nativetimes.net) - November 26, 2019 - 11:26am

The U.S. Justice Department holds a roundtable discussion in Alaska about tribal justice. (Photo-Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Facebook)

New initiative helps address public safety in Alaska Oglala Sioux Tribe impeaches its vice president Canadian government appeals child welfare ruling https://www.nativenews.net/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/nnn112619.mp3

The post Tuesday, November 26, 2019 appeared first on National Native News, by Antonia Gonzales.

Categories: UNITED STATES

A Warren administration will be a strong partner for Indian Country

INDIAN COUNTRY MEDIA NETWORK - November 26, 2019 - 10:51am

Elizabeth Warren is committed to ensuring that tribal nations have a seat at the table and integrating Native voices into policy decisions says Amber Torres

Categories: UNITED STATES

Cloud Peak Energy's Ch. 11 Releases Face SEC Pushback

LAW360 (Native feed) - November 26, 2019 - 10:45am
The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission told a Delaware bankruptcy court Tuesday that Cloud Peak Energy Inc.'s Chapter 11 plan should eliminate or revise certain provisions that would release certain parties from liability for past conduct.

Operation Lady Justice features artwork by D.G. Smalling of Choctaw Nation

INDIANZ.COM - November 26, 2019 - 10:34am
The work of a Choctaw Nation artist inspired the name of a government-wide initiative aimed at addressing the crisis of missing and murdered Native Americans.
Categories: UNITED STATES

Obama-Era Restrictions On Oregon Logging Knocked Down

LAW360 (Native feed) - November 26, 2019 - 10:20am
A D.C. federal judge has pointed to a long-standing law to shoot down Obama-era restrictions on logging in western Oregon as well as a proclamation enlarging a national monument issued in the final days of Barack Obama's presidency.

United American Indians of New England host 50th National Day of Mourning

INDIANZ.COM - November 26, 2019 - 9:13am
This year's event focuses on the crisis of missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls and Two Spirit people.
Categories: UNITED STATES

Oglala Sioux Tribe Impeaches Vice President for Malfeasance

NATIVE NEWS ONLINE - November 26, 2019 - 9:07am

Oglala Sioux Tribe Vice President Darla Black was impeached on Monday evening.

Published November 26, 2019

PINE RIDGE INDIAN RESERVATION —The Ogala Sioux Tribal Council on Monday evening impeached the Tribe’s vice presidend because of malfeasance. The charges brought against Darla Black, who was elected vice president of Oglala Sioux Tribe (OST) in November 2016, came from three former employees who accused her of abusing her position, bullying and sexual harassment.

Last night’s impeachment hearing was set on October 29 by the OST Tribal Council after receiving four complaints from the former three employees. Black was suspended with pay on that date as well.

According to the OST constitution, elected tribal officials can be impeached if two-thirds of the Tribal Council determines they committed crimes, gross incompetency, corruption or malfeasance.

The council voted 20-0 with one abstention to seat former OST Vice President Tom Poor Bear, the second highest vote getter in last year’s tribal election against her, to serve out Black’s term as Vice President.

The post Oglala Sioux Tribe Impeaches Vice President for Malfeasance appeared first on Native News Online.

Categories: UNITED STATES

Tribal sovereignty foe Slade Gorton speaks out against Donald Trump

INDIANZ.COM - November 26, 2019 - 8:55am
Slade Gorton, a former U.S. Senator who was ousted from office after tribal leaders slammed his anti-sovereignty record, is still alive. Surprised?
Categories: UNITED STATES

Ho-Chunk Nation showcases Native food at gaming facility

INDIANZ.COM (gaming) - November 26, 2019 - 8:28am
A Ho-Chunk Nation casino is celebrating Native American Heritage Month with a Native food menu created by Chef Elena Terry, a tribal citizen.

Greenhouse gas emissions are still going up 'it doesn't look too good'

INDIAN COUNTRY MEDIA NETWORK - November 26, 2019 - 7:59am

UN: 'Quick wins' needed to keep climate goals within reach

Categories: UNITED STATES

'Strong hearts to the front. Indigenous women are resilient'

INDIAN COUNTRY MEDIA NETWORK - November 26, 2019 - 7:31am

Tantoo Cardinal: “Sue Lynn Blackbird is a strong woman” and a portrayal of a character that is “right in my territory.”

Categories: UNITED STATES

Judge fights for job despite 'inappropriate' views on Indigenous people, women

CBC ABORIGINAL NEWS - November 26, 2019 - 7:00am
Hinton courthouse

An Alberta judge has lost his job over "completely inappropriate" beliefs and behaviours involving his views on Indigenous people and victims of domestic and sexual assault. And now, Judge Donald Norheim is fighting to get his job back.

Categories: CANADA

K'asho Got'ı̨nę celebrate new protected area near Fort Good Hope

CBC ABORIGINAL NEWS - November 26, 2019 - 7:00am
Fort Good Hope Ramparts Protected Area

Ts’udé Nilįné Tueyata, also known as the Ramparts River and Wetlands, is a sacred site for K’asho Got’ı̨nę people in Fort Good Hope, N.W.T., that will be protected from development. At 10,000 square kilometres, it’s roughly twice the size of Prince Edward Island.

Categories: CANADA

President Trump promises action on missing and murdered in Indian Country

INDIANZ.COM - November 26, 2019 - 5:26am
He didn't offend anyone. He didn't brag about himself. He didn't lash out at his opponents. He was just the president, among a group of tribal leaders.
Categories: UNITED STATES

MoCreebec want recognition as distinct Cree community

CBC ABORIGINAL NEWS - November 26, 2019 - 5:00am
Allan Jolly

MoCreebec looking for status as a distinct First Nations community and a new home in either Smooth Rock Falls or Moosonee.

Categories: CANADA

Federal Court to hear 2nd day of arguments on compensation order for First Nations children

CBC ABORIGINAL NEWS - November 26, 2019 - 4:00am
CANADA-ABORIGINAL/

A second day of arguments unfolds before the Federal Court on Tuesday over the federal government’s efforts to quash a human rights tribunal ruling ordering compensation for First Nations children impacted by the on-reserve child welfare system. 

Categories: CANADA

Arizona saw children’s obesity drop after WIC required healthier foods

INDIANZ.COM - November 26, 2019 - 3:32am
Child obesity rates declined after the federal Women, Infants, and Children program increased access to healthier food products.
Categories: UNITED STATES

AMERIND Risk Seeking Submissions for Nationwide Native American Poster Contest

NATIVE KNOT - November 26, 2019 - 1:00am

SANTA ANA PUEBLO, N.M. — AMERIND Risk is seeking submissions for their 2020 AMERIND Safety Poster Contest. The competition is open to young artists from grades K-8 and aims to promote safety throughout Indian Country. From the national entries, three winners will be selected from the grade categories of K-3, 4-6, and 7-8 and will receive $1,000.


To enter, artists must submit their own unique, safety themed poster to their local/regional housing authority. Posters must be on  8.5 x 11 sheet of paper and include the following artist  information on the back:



  • First and Last name

  • Grade

  • Tribal Affiliation

  • Phone Number

  • Housing Authority


Artists must submit their posters to their housing authority by December 31, 2019, to be eligible to win. Every housing authority will select one winner from the three categories (K-3, 4-6, and 7-8) and submit these entries to the AMERIND Safety Services Team.


National online voting will commence in April 2020. The winners will be announced at the AMERIND Annual Meeting in Seattle, WA in May 2020!


For questions about the 2020 AMERIND Safety Poster Contest, please call the AMERIND Risk Safety Team at (800) 352-3496.

Categories: UNITED STATES

VAWA Bill Leaves Native Women Less Protected and Infringe on Tribal Sovereignty

NATIVE KNOT - November 26, 2019 - 1:00am

New Senate VAWA Bill Would Leave Native Women Less Protected and Infringe on Tribal Sovereignty


WASHINGTON — On Wednesday, Senator Joni Ernst (R-IA) introduced new Republican VAWA legislation that would leave Native women less protected from violent offenders by destabilizing tribal courts and infringing on tribal sovereignty. After the failure of bipartisan negotiations, Senator Ernst took the lead to introduce this highly problematic language despite hearing concerns during several meetings with Native women, tribal leaders, and tribal organizations.


IF ENACTED, THIS LEGISLATION WOULD DESTABILIZE TRIBAL JUSTICE SYSTEMS BY IMPOSING UNDUE BURDENS AND RESTRICTIONS ON TRIBAL COURTS FAR BEYOND THOSE IMPOSED ON FEDERAL AND STATE COURTS, INCLUDING AUDITS BY THE ATTORNEY GENERAL AND LEAVES TRIBES VULNERABLE TO LAWSUITS BY DEFENDANTS OF TRIBAL COURTS THROUGH THE STRIPPING OF SOVEREIGN IMMUNITY.


Ultimately, this bill would eliminate the gains made in VAWA 2013 and infringes on the inherent tribal authority of tribal nations to prosecute crimes committed against their citizens on tribal lands.


Although partisanship has unfortunately introduced itself into VAWA discussions among certain key Senate voices, there is clear hope that partisanship will not prevail among those who seek to protect women and children throughout Indian country and rural America, where the majority of tribal courts preside and provide protections to Indians and non-Indians alike.


Senator Ernst’s bill puts a partisan spin on a non-partisan issue. Senator Ernst’s bill includes the expanded jurisdiction over covered crimes, yet strips tribal court authority at the same time, while providing for increased authorization amounts for grants to Tribes, and several marker bills in an attempt to garner tribal support. Safety for Native women is not a partisan issue, and nothing can serve as a bargaining chip for the safety of Native women and the restoration of tribal sovereignty.


In contrast to the legislation Senator Ernst has introduced, the House version of VAWA, H.R. 1585, passed with significant bipartisan support and Senate Bill 2843, introduced on November 13, 2019, includes the tribal provisions that national, regional, and local tribal organizations have worked hard for. There is no reason to substitute the language in H.R. 1585 and S. 2843 with language that will preclude tribal courts, and ultimately tribal nations, from protecting their most vulnerable populations, Native women and children. We cannot go backward and introduce VAWA provisions that destabilize and limit the inherent authority of tribal nations.


“Despite the fact that the implementation of VAWA 2013 has been a success both for the protection of victims in our communities as well as the due process rights of non-Indian defendants Ernst’s bill is based on the assumption that the protections for Native victims in VAWA 2013 must be rolled back because tribal courts are not capable of fairly administering justice,” said Mary Kathryn Nagle, Partner, Counsel, National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center. “Since 2013, tribes have clearly demonstrated this assumption to be false. Tribal courts prosecuting non-Indian defendants already provide the same if not more due process rights than state and federal courts. Placing paternalistic restrictions on tribal courts in the name of ‘due process’ is nothing more than a disguise for prejudice. Legislation that strips tribal courts of their inherent authority to protect victims in their communities based on prejudice alone must be stopped.”


“NIWRC looks forward to engaging in continued dialogue with Senate Republicans and Democrats regarding the need to protect Native women. The Ernst bill was unfortunately drafted in a process that excluded the voices of our tribal leaders and our Native women survivors,” said NIWRC Board Member Deborah Parker. “This process has resulted in a bill, that in its current form, would constitute a significant rollback of the protections that VAWA 2013 provided to Native women. We cannot afford to step back. We can only move forward.”


“As the Chairwoman of the Tulalip Tribes, one of the first tribes to exercise criminal jurisdiction over non-Indians for domestic violence-related crimes under the 2013 VAWA tribal provisions, we are deeply disappointed by the VAWA legislation introduced by Senator Ernst on Wednesday,” said Chairwoman Teri Gobin, Tulalip Tribes. “The bill erodes tribal sovereignty and attacks the independence and integrity of our tribal judicial systems. The provisions in Senator Ernst’s Bill would prevent tribal courts and tribal governments from protecting the most vulnerable, our women and children. The public safety of our communities is of the utmost importance for all citizens, and we urge all senators to support S. 2843, the Senate companion to the bipartisan bill passed by the House last April.”


Tribal issues are nonpartisan issues. As a Native woman and a survivor, I call on the Senate to stand with Native women and survivors and not allow partisan politics to get in the way of protecting the safety of Native women and the sovereignty of tribal nations,” said Cherrah Giles, Chairwoman, National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center. “NIWRC remains committed to working with senators on both sides of the aisle to enhance safety for Native women.”


NIWRC remains hopeful that the Senate will be able to pass a bipartisan reauthorization of VAWA that protects tribal sovereignty, instead of diminishing it, and thereby increasing safety for Native women and children.

Categories: UNITED STATES

FBI Offers $10,000 Reward for Information in Olivia Lone Bear’s Death

NATIVE KNOT - November 26, 2019 - 1:00am

FBI Offers $10,000 Reward for Information in Olivia Lone Bear’s Death, Whose Body was Found Strapped on Passenger’s Side of Truck in Lake


NEW TOWN, N.D. — The FBI announced this past week it is offering a reward of up to $10,000 for information in the death of Olivia Lone Bear of New Town, North Dakota.


Lone Bear was reported missing to the Three Affiliated Tribes Police Department on Oct. 27, 2017. Her body was found the following summer in a pickup in a lake after a sonar-equipped boat found the truck near the Fort Berthold Reservation on July 31, 2018. No obvious injuries were found on her body, and an autopsy failed to determine the cause of death.


After all this time, federal officials are finally telling the Lone Bear’s family details they discovered in the investigation into her death.


THE BODY OF THE 32-YEAR-OLD MOTHER WAS STRAPPED INTO THE PASSENGER SIDE THE SUBMERGED PICKUP TRUCK WITH A SEATBELT AROUND HER WAIST, ACCORDING TO UNSEALED COURT DOCUMENTS RELEASED ON WEDNESDAY WHEN UNITED STATES ATTORNEY DREW WRIGLEY AND FBI ASSISTANT SPECIAL AGENT IN CHARGE ROBERT PERRY TRAVELED TO NEW TOWN TO BRIEF FAMILY MEMBERS ON THE STATUS OF THE INVESTIGATION.


“Olivia’s family and members of her community want to know what happened to her and so do we,” Minneapolis FBI Special Agent in Charge Jill Sanborn said in a statement.


The cause of death was ruled undetermined.


The story of Olivia Lone Bear is just one of the thousands of American Indian women who go missing every year. American Indian tribes and national organizations, such as the National Congress of American Indians, are working hard to bring more awareness to this crisis happening in Indian Country.


Anyone with information is urged to call 1-800-CALLFBI.

Categories: UNITED STATES

Pages

Subscribe to Cleveland American Indian Movement aggregator