Feed aggregator

NCAI Supports a Cherokee Nation Delegate in Congress

NATIVE NEWS ONLINE - November 7, 2019 - 12:01am

Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin, Jr. addresses the NCAI delegates and thanks them for their consideration at the end of his remarks. Native News Online photograph by Levi Rickert

Published November 7, 2019 

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — Tribes across the country support the U.S. Government honoring treaty obligations by sending a Cherokee Delegate to the U.S. House of Representatives.

The National Congress of American Indians passed a resolution on Oct. 25 with the language during its 76thAnnual National Convention in Albuquerque.

NCAI was established in 1944 and is the oldest and largest national organization of American Indian and Alaska Native tribal governments. More than 170 tribal nations attended the convention.

“The Cherokee Nation now has the backing of NCAI member tribes from across the country who also believe in Congress obligating treaty rights,” Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin Jr. said. “This right is not only important to Cherokee Nation, but it stands for a proposition vital to all of Indian Country which is that treaties are the law of the land and the United States government should keep its word.”

The NCAI resolution supports the Cherokee Nation’s assertion of its treaty right to seat a delegate in the U.S. House of Representatives, as guaranteed in the Cherokee Nation’s treaties of 1785, 1835, and 1866. 

“Now Therefore be it resolved, that the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) fully supports the exercise of tribal treaty rights, including the seating of a Delegate in the U.S. House of Representatives where promised, and calls upon the House of Representatives to fulfill its obligation to tribal nations, including the Cherokee Nation, by seating its named Delegate in Congress,” the resolution states. 

Chief Hoskin’s Congressional delegate nomination of Kim Teehee came in August, just days after he was sworn into office and is aimed at strengthening tribal sovereignty.

The Cherokee Nation delegate is referenced in both the Treaty of Hopewell from 1785 and Treaty of New Echota from 1835 between the Cherokee Nation and federal government. The Treaty of 1866 also reaffirms all previous treaties between the Cherokee Nation and United States. The tribe continues to work with Congressional leaders to move the appointment forward.

Teehee has worked for years advocating in Congress, on a bi-partisan basis, for the interests of Cherokee Nation. Before being named the tribe’s vice president of government relations in 2014, Teehee served President Barack Obama as the first-ever senior policy advisor for Native American affairs in the White House Domestic Policy Council for three years. Prior to serving in the White House, she was senior advisor to the U.S. House of Representatives Native American Caucus Co-Chair, Rep. Dale Kildee D-MI. 

The NCAI resolution can be found at http://www.ncai.org/resolutions/ABQ-19-024.pdf

 

The post NCAI Supports a Cherokee Nation Delegate in Congress appeared first on Native News Online.

Categories: UNITED STATES

Thunderbird Review Anthology Call for Submissions

NATIVE NEWS ONLINE - November 7, 2019 - 12:01am

Published November 7, 2019

CLOQUET, Minn. — The Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College English Department is calling for submissions to enter in the eighth edition of The Thunderbird Review, the college’s annual anthology of creative writing and art. The deadline for submissions is December 10, 2019.

Submission eligibility includes current students who are enrolled at Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College, University of Wisconsin-Superior, University of Minnesota-Duluth, College of St. Scholastica, or Lake Superior College, along with residents of Carlton, St. Louis, Lake, Aitkin, and Pine counties in Minnesota, and Ashland, Douglas, Bayfield, Burnett, Sawyer, and Washburn counties in Wisconsin.

Submissions must fall into one of  five different categories: short fiction (3000 words maximum), creative non-fiction (3000 words maximum), poetry (three poems maximum), artwork (three works maximum; any media, but art must be submitted as a jpeg file via email), and music (three songs maximum, submit as a link to a website like YouTube, SoundCloud, or BandCamp).

Authors and artists may submit one entry per category except as noted above. The Thunderbird Review selection committee will not accept work that has previously been published, is under consideration elsewhere, or has received an award.

Submitted works must be sent via email, and only email submissions will be accepted. Provide contact information including the submitter’s name, address, telephone number, email address, the title(s) of works being submitted, and a 50-word bio written in third person. The author’s name should not be on submitted manuscripts, although artwork may be signed. Writing entries should use Times New Roman size 12 font and be sent as an attachment in .doc or .docx format. Send submissions via email to anthology@fdltcc.edu.

All contributors selected for the final publication will receive one complimentary copy. Questions may be directed to Darci Schummer at dschummer@fdltcc.edu.

The post Thunderbird Review Anthology Call for Submissions appeared first on Native News Online.

Categories: UNITED STATES

NHBP Named First StormReady Native American Tribe in Michigan

NATIVE NEWS ONLINE - November 7, 2019 - 12:01am

NHBP Emergency Manager James Zoss, Grand Rapids National Weather Service StormReady Program Coordinator and Meteorologist Nathan Jeruzel, and NHBP Tribal Council Chairperson Jamie Stuck, Vice Chairperson Dorie Rios, Secretary Nancy Smit, Treasurer Dr. Jeff Chivis and Sergeant-At-Arms Homer A. Mandoka.

Published November 7, 2019

FULTON, Mich. —The Nottawaseppi Huron Band of the Potawatomi (NHBP) has been named the first StormReady Native American tribe in the state of Michigan. This initiative to achieve StormReady status, led by the NHBP Tribal Emergency Preparedness Committee and Tribal Council Sergeant-At-Arms Homer A. Mandoka, was completed in October, resulting in NHBP being the first Native American tribe in the state to become StormReady, and the second tribe in the region to receive this designation.

“NHBP is proud to have earned the designation as the first StormReady tribe in the state of Michigan,” said NHBP Tribal Council Chairperson Jamie Stuck. “This accomplishment will help the tribe achieve our strategic plan vision of protecting and promoting the well-being of the NHBP tribal community for the next seven generations.”

The StormReady program helps arm communities across the country with the communication and safety skills needed to save lives and property before, during and after weather-related events. The program encourages communities to take a new, proactive approach to improving local hazardous weather operations by providing emergency managers with clear-cut guidelines on how to improve their hazardous weather operations.

To achieve the status of StormReady, NHBP met the following criteria:

  • Establish a 24-hour warning point and emergency operations center
  • Have more than one way to receive severe weather warnings and forecasts, and to alert the public
  • Create a system that monitors weather conditions locally
  • Promote the importance of public readiness through community seminars
  • Develop a formal hazardous weather plan, which includes training severe weather spotters and holding emergency exercises

“The National Weather Service recognizes NHBP for improving the timeliness and effectiveness of hazardous-weather warnings. The Tribe is diligent and its proactive approach to increase communication and preparedness will ensure system-wide protections,” said NHBP Tribal Council Sergeant-At-Arms Homer A. Mandoka, who also chairs the Tribal Emergency Preparedness Committee. “The StormReady achievement is our commitment to preserve life on the Pine Creek Indian Reservation. It takes passion and dedication to train individuals how to act and when to react under hazardous warnings. I will like to commend Tribal Emergency Manager Jim Zoss, Director of Communications Judi Henckel, and fellow committee members Dawn Irwin, Al TenBrink Jr, Brian Chivis, Dan Green, Ben Tenney, Carter Bright, Nicole Edson and Bret Miller.”

The post NHBP Named First StormReady Native American Tribe in Michigan appeared first on Native News Online.

Categories: UNITED STATES

Dane County Landfill Biogas Facility Fuels Ho-Chunk Gaming Madison’s First Renewable Natural Gas Maintenance Truck

NATIVE NEWS ONLINE - November 7, 2019 - 12:00am

Utilizing the Dane County Landfill Biogas CNG Station to fill the Pride of the Ho-Chunk Gaming Madison Maintenance fleet is Dane County Executive Joe Parisi and Ho-Chunk Gaming Madison’s Executive Manager, Daniel Brown.

Published November 7, 2019

Ho-Chunk Nation’s Ongoing Effort to be Environmentally Conscious

MADISON, Wisc. — Ho-Chunk Gaming Madison is excited to announce that for the first time they are now using Renewable Natural Gas (RNG) to power one of their Maintenance trucks.

During Earth Week in April of this year the Dane County Landfill Biogas Facility opened a $28 million plant as the first of its kind in the United States.  The plant converts the collected methane into compressed natural gas (CNG) which is then injected into its pipeline.  It turns decomposed waste (and cow manure) into renewable fuel which can be bought and sold.

Ho-Chunk Gaming Madison has formed a partnership with Dane County Landfill Biogas Facility to become the Ho-Chunk Nation’s first natural gas fueled vehicle, powered with the cleanest transportation fuel available.  When this fuel is used for vehicles they have a lower emission rate than gasoline or diesel.  Ho-Chunk Gaming Madison has kept their pledge to remain a sustainable leader in Madison and they continue to try to reduce their carbon footprint through research and identify environmentally engaged options.

Ho-Chunk Gaming Madison Maintenance Manager, Erik Lincoln, said he realized an opportunity to partner with the Dane County Landfill to possibly source fuel for his fleet. A 2017 Sustain Dane Badger ‘Bioneer’ Award Top 5 nominee, Lincoln is in his own right is a sustainability leader and one of the driving forces behind the casino’s sustainability initiatives.  He is always looking for ways to meld being a caretaker of the planet while continuing to foster community relations.

Lincoln, a bit of a Futurist, was looking for an alternative to petroleum fuels to power his work truck. “I felt that a renewable natural gas was the best solution for the department while we wait for electric trucks to become a more viable option,” Lincoln stated, “This new work truck is our “greenest” project of Fiscal Year 2019.”

“We’re pleased to be able to combine not only local community knowledge right in our backyard but, also an innovative, first of its kind in the Nation sustainable practice as this one,” said Daniel Brown, Executive Manager, Ho-Chunk Gaming Madison “It is our responsibility to implement earth-conscious solutions within our tribally owned enterprises so we can set a higher standard and be the example to encourage other organizations to do so as they are able.”

The post Dane County Landfill Biogas Facility Fuels Ho-Chunk Gaming Madison’s First Renewable Natural Gas Maintenance Truck appeared first on Native News Online.

Categories: UNITED STATES

Five Reasons Why Egypt Is Perfect Destination for Tourists

NATIVE NEWS ONLINE - November 7, 2019 - 12:00am

Published November 7, 2019

Egypt brags of a stupendously lovely scene loaded up with cultural jewels. Sun, sea, and sand blended with a dash of exotic culture and legacy, the spouting river Nile, antiquated landmarks, huge deserts, world-renowned coral reefs to cosmopolitan urban communities – enough motivations to take one of those tours in Egypt! That guarantees you don’t need to peruse through several holiday destinations over the globe for your ideal vacation – the mesmerizing land of Egypt has everything! 

A land that brought forth one of the ‘Seven Wonders of the Ancient World’ – the Great Pyramids of Giza, probably the biggest bazaar in the Middle East situated in Cairo – Khan-el-Khalili, seaside resorts of Hurghada and Sharm El Sheik – perfect for family vacations, jam-packed seashore resorts overflowing with extravagance, water sports activities, amusement and shopping… the rundown is long! Here are 5 reasons why Egypt is a perfect destination for tourists. 

1. Politics and protests 

The common distress you see on the news is absolutely a domestic political issue. Egypt remains very safe for tourists and despite the fact that there might be demonstrations every once in a while, these have nothing to do with Westerners and there is no evil inclination towards guests. The media tend to focus the spotlight on the negatives. In any case, two or three streets over from any distress, you’ll locate a tranquil road where life is going on as ordinary with elderly men playing backgammon and women shopping. 

2. Crowd-free famous attractions 

The iconic destinations are moderately vacant of crowds. For example, the number of guests permitted to enter the tomb deep inside Cheops pyramid every day is typically constrained and tickets will in general sell out promptly in the early part of the day. By and by its moderately simple to get hold of them and you won’t have those irritating busloads of tourists impeding your photos. 

3. Warm welcome 

The people of Egypt are truly glad to have tourists visiting and will consistently give travelers a warm welcome. Generally, these individuals will be people who somehow or another are associated with the tourism industry, yet it’s normal to get a genuine and hearty “Welcome to Egypt!” greeting from a common man on the road who is proud of his nation and wants to display its best face to the world. 

4. Value for cash 

There are deals to be had, consistently, particularly while business in the bazaars is moderately slow. There are bazaars in all the primary tourist towns in Egypt, for example, Luxor and Aswan, yet the mother of all is Khan el Khalili in Islamic Cairo. It’s an immense labyrinth of stalls brimming with each possible kind of souvenir and the stallholders are constantly prepared to haggle. 

5. A fantasy destination

Egypt stays one of the world’s most entrancing and spectacular destinations. When most European communities were all the while wearing animal skins and simply working out how to develop, ancient Egypt had arrived at the apogee of human civilization and kept up a steady and sophisticated culture for about three millennia; a mind-boggling accomplishment by present-day standards.

The post Five Reasons Why Egypt Is Perfect Destination for Tourists appeared first on Native News Online.

Categories: UNITED STATES

Mercede Johnson Crowned Miss Diné College 2019-2020

TRIBAL COLLEGE JOURNAL - November 6, 2019 - 6:42pm

Johnson, who is pursuing a bachelor of science degree in public health, excited the crowd when she sang a traditional Navajo Mountain Song for her traditional talent segment while her contemporary talent was a demonstration on how to perform CPR.

The post Mercede Johnson Crowned Miss Diné College 2019-2020 appeared first on Tribal College Journal of American Indian Higher Education.

Categories: EDUCATION, UNITED STATES

New North Dakota Blue Book Released with Chapters Honoring Aviation, 50 Years of UTTC

TRIBAL COLLEGE JOURNAL - November 6, 2019 - 6:42pm

Current UTTC president Russ McDonald says the college is glad to get the recognition for its longevity. He says going forward, workforce development will be a critical issue to help address the state’s roughly 30,000 open jobs.

The post New North Dakota Blue Book Released with Chapters Honoring Aviation, 50 Years of UTTC appeared first on Tribal College Journal of American Indian Higher Education.

Categories: EDUCATION, UNITED STATES

Culinary Arts Students Prepare Indigenous Cuisine at Fundraiser

TRIBAL COLLEGE JOURNAL - November 6, 2019 - 6:41pm

Each year the American Indian College Fund (AICF) schedules events to raise money toward scholarships for American Indian students attending a tribal college or university. Denver E.A.T.S.S. was a promotion to share food and culture through the revitalization of Native American food.

The post Culinary Arts Students Prepare Indigenous Cuisine at Fundraiser appeared first on Tribal College Journal of American Indian Higher Education.

Categories: EDUCATION, UNITED STATES

Ogimaa Duke Peltier honoured to be new Anishinabek Nation Children's Commissioner

CBC ABORIGINAL NEWS - November 6, 2019 - 6:14pm
Duke Peltier

Ogimaa Duke Peltier of Wiikwemkoong Unceded Territory says it is truly an honour to have been appointed as the new Anishinabek Nation Children’s Commissioner.

Categories: CANADA

David Chartrand to lead Métis National Council until election after president steps down

CBC ABORIGINAL NEWS - November 6, 2019 - 6:06pm
David Chartrand

Manitoba Metis Federation president David Chartrand will now lead the Métis National Council after president Clément Chartier announced on Wednesday he will scale back his involvement.

Categories: CANADA

Coroner to probe death of 19 year-old First Nation man found near Thunder Bay hospital hours after discharge

CBC ABORIGINAL NEWS - November 6, 2019 - 6:02pm
Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre

Ontario's Office of the Chief Coroner says it's investigating the death of a 19-year-old First Nations man a few hours after he was released from the Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre.

Categories: CANADA

US health officials link childhood trauma to adult illness

INDIAN COUNTRY MEDIA NETWORK - November 6, 2019 - 5:48pm

'Women, blacks and American Indians and Alaskan Natives were more likely to experience four or more kinds of harm during childhood'

Categories: UNITED STATES

Loren Anthony: actor, musician, youth advocate helping elders through ‘Chizh for Cheii’

INDIAN COUNTRY MEDIA NETWORK - November 6, 2019 - 5:35pm

Indian Country Today features Native Americans across the country during the month of November #NativeIn2019

Categories: UNITED STATES

Stay tuned: A nation watches impeachment drama play out

INDIAN COUNTRY MEDIA NETWORK - November 6, 2019 - 5:30pm

Republicans and Democrats are divided as hearings begin Nov. 13

Categories: UNITED STATES

2 First Nations near Halifax to vote on potential settlement of 100-year-old land dispute

CBC ABORIGINAL NEWS - November 6, 2019 - 4:16pm
Jennifer Denny

A group of Mi'kmaq from communities engaged in a multi-million dollar land claim negotiation in Nova Scotia are weighing the implications of a surrender of reserve land set aside for their ancestors.

Categories: CANADA

Valley fever could spread beyond Southwest

INDIAN COUNTRY MEDIA NETWORK - November 6, 2019 - 4:16pm

More than 1,000 Californians are hospitalized each year for valley fever and approximately 8 of every 100 people hospitalized die from the infection annually

Categories: UNITED STATES

OSHA Asks 8th Circ. To Weigh Its Say Over Tribal Fishing Co.

LAW360 (Native feed) - November 6, 2019 - 4:12pm
The U.S. Department of Labor has urged the Eighth Circuit to review a ruling that a tribal fishing company didn’t have to submit to an Occupational Safety and Health Administration inspection following the drowning deaths of two employees on the tribe’s Minnesota reservation.

Purdue Opioid Suits Put On Hold Until April

LAW360 (Native feed) - November 6, 2019 - 3:33pm
A New York bankruptcy judge hit pause Wednesday on the opioid lawsuits against Purdue Pharma LP until next year after hearing that the drugmaker and the governmental entities suing it had made progress discussing oversight and information-sharing measures.

EPA Can't Delay Landfill Emissions Regs, Court Rules

LAW360 (Native feed) - November 6, 2019 - 2:36pm
A California federal judge has ruled the U.S Environmental Protection Agency can't avoid a court order to comply with Obama-era landfill air pollution requirements by simply extending its own deadlines on the guidelines, rejecting the agency's request for more time.

Louis Riel and the Red River Resistance honoured in new Canada Post stamp

CBC ABORIGINAL NEWS - November 6, 2019 - 2:36pm
Canada Post stamp, Louis Riel and Red River Resistance

Louis Riel and the resistance he led to protect Métis people and their rights during the turbulent events leading up to the creation of the province of Manitoba are being honoured by Canada Post.

Categories: CANADA

Pages

Subscribe to Cleveland American Indian Movement aggregator