AMERICAN INDIAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION

Interview with Dr. Lee Francis of Native Realities Press

The American Indian Library Association would like to recognize AILA member Dr. Lee Francis who received the 2018 JCLC Author Award.  The Author Award recognizes an outstanding contribution to the body of ethnic literature. You can view his work at nativerealities.com.

How did you get started with Native Realities Press and publishing?

I founded Native Realities in 2015

Who are your role models?

I have so many role models!  I think anyone who is working on taking care of their communities with a good heart and keen imagination is a role model for me.  Elders, young people, creatives, they are all folks I wish to be when I grow up.

What can librarians do to support more publishing by Native small press publishers?

I think librarians have such limited time but working with Native communities on finding published works is critical to helping us, as Native publishers, continue to create work.  Also pushing larger distributors to carry and promote Native small publishers is also important.

What is your favorite comic?

With Stan Lee’s passing, I have been circling back to some of the Marvel classics: Avengers, Spider Man, Thor.  It’s just lovely work and great storytelling.

What is the best part of your job?

I get to be a nerd.  There’s nothing more satisfying than talking about pop culture as my job itself.

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Register for the Joint Conference of Librarians of Color 2018!

JCLC 2018 Registration is now open! Registration is being managed by the American Library Association’s registration system. You may register with your ALA membership or profile credentials or create a profile when you begin your registration process. You do not need to be a member of ALA to attend the JCLC.

The 3rd National Joint Conference of Librarians of Color in 2018, “Gathering all Peoples: Embracing Culture & Community” will take place September 26-30, 2018 at the Albuquerque Convention Center in  New Mexico.

The Joint Conference of Librarians of Color (JCLC) is a conference open to all library staff, students, influencers, and decision-makers interested in exploring inclusive policies, practices, and issue of diversity in libraries and how they affect the ethnic communities who use our services.

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The American Indian Library Association and the Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association Announce Winners of the 2018 Talk Story Grant

April 16, 2018

The American Indian Library Association (AILA) and the Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association (APALA), supported by Toyota Financial Services, are pleased to award a $750 grant to each of the following eight libraries and community organizations to host Talk Story: Sharing stories, sharing culture programming. The winning libraries and community organizations are:

American Indian Health & Family Services, Michigan — Grant funds will be used to support early childhood programming for two age groups, 0-5 and 5-8. The 0-5 age group events will include storytime, crafts and singing. Books written by American Indian authors will be given to the families who attend. The Little Dreamers event, age 5-8, will focus on tradition and history. Books used will address the experiences of residential schools as well as current concerns in the Native community.

Aniak Public Library, Alaska — Building on a successful project last summer, Aniak Public Library will write and publish a series of Aniak Alaska books. These books will reflect the community and the Alaska Native culture. Workshops throughout the summer and fall will culminate in a community event to celebrate the completed books.

Chinese American Citizen’s Alliance, Washington D.C. — Partnering with the DC Public Library and 1882 Foundation, underserved APA youth in the DC area will be participating in a three-month weekly art program geared towards APA identity development. Ten to fifteen middle school-aged youth will be provided multimedia art instructions in various techniques and cultures. 

Cranston Public Library, Rhode Island — Partnering with the Center for Southeast Asians, the Cranston Public Library is hosting a series of programs to help children discover the richness of Cambodian culture. Programs will include providing youth with modern technology to bridge the generational gap by conducting interviews with families; recreating jewelry, sculptures, and tools using the library’s 3D printers; and examining the library’s collection of books in Khmer to write letters with the help of a former monk.

Hopi Public Library, Arizona — Coinciding with the Summer Reading Program, the Hopi Story Time project proposes an intergenerational story and activity hour that promotes Hopi language learning. There will be 10 story time events through the Hopitutuqayki Sikisve (The Hopi Bookmobile). Each event will involve a speaker reading from Hopi coyote tales and activities that accompany the story hour will include: taking booklets of coyote stories home; author talks with Anita Poleahla, the writer/author behind Mesa Media; and creating a timeline with events from Hopi history.

Newark Free Library, Delaware — A local poet laureate, educator and arts administrator will lead 10-15 pre-teens and young adults in a parol activity during Filipino American Heritage Month. Oral stories, poems, and personal experiences will be shared.

San Juan College, New Mexico — Partnering with the San Juan College Childhood Family Development Center (CFDC), San Juan College will collaborate with Our Last Chants, a local Navajo indie band, to provide cultural and interactive experiences. The band will visit the children, learning a Navajo song or nursery rhyme. They will also create a CD of Navajo/English nursery rhymes for the CFDC children and families.

South Plainfield Public Library, New Jersey — South Plainfield Public Library will be expanding their current Diwali program by adding several new components garnered from community input and analysis. Programs include dance lessons, henna designs, sampling of Indian food, and rangoli creations. Funds will also go toward purchasing culturally appropriate books for the collection.

Talk Story: Sharing stories, sharing culture is a literacy program that reaches out to Asian Pacific American (APA) and American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) children and their families. The program celebrates and explores their stories through books, oral traditions, and art to provide an interactive, enriching experience. Grants provide financial support to libraries and community organizations who want to introduce a Talk Story program into their library.

Talk Story: Sharing stories, sharing culture is a joint project between the American Indian Library Association (www.aila.org) and the Asian Pacific American Librarians Association (www.apalaweb.org). It started as part of ALA 2009-2010 President Camila Alire’s Family Literacy Focus Initiative. 2018 is the ninth year that AILA and APALA have partnered on the Talk Story project and allocated grant funding to libraries to implement programs geared towards the APA/AIAN communities. This is the fifth year that Toyota Financial Services has helped to sponsor grants.  

Committee Chairs are Liana Juliano (AILA), Katrina Nye (APALA) and Xuemin Zhong (APALA). For more information, please visit the Talk Story web site: www.talkstorytogether.org.

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AILA Statement on ALSC Children’s Literature Legacy Award

For Immediate Release

July 11, 2018

The American Indian Library Association (AILA) commends the recent decision by the Association for Library Service to Children and ALA for taking the long overdue action to change the name of the Wilder Award to the Children’s Literature Legacy Award. The Children’s Literature Legacy Award honors an author or illustrator whose books, published in the United States, have made, over a period of years, a significant and lasting contribution to children’s literature through books that demonstrate integrity and respect for all children’s lives and experiences.

For many years, AILA members have led the effort to fight against stereotypes of Native Americans in children’s and young adult books. At the 1991 ALA Annual Conference in Atlanta, AILA presented a program to address Indian stereotypes in children’s literature. There were no children’s librarians from AILA looking at this issue in 1991, but a young children’s literature professor at the University of Pittsburgh’s School of Library and Information Science (SLIS) was looking at ethnic stereotypes generally, and she agreed to be the keynote speaker. AILA president Naomi Caldwell and secretary Lisa Mitten produced a handout focusing specifically on Native American images, “I” is NOT for Indians: Selective Bibliography and Guide.” The room of ALA attendees reached capacity of 50, and an overflowing crowd stretch into the hallway. AILA had tapped into a need that went beyond our own concerns; the response was encouraging and gratifying. The young SLIS faculty member was Dr. Carla Hayden, now the Librarian of Congress.

Since that initial program in 1991, AILA has continued to grow into a very strong affiliate of ALA. American Indian librarians continue to join the profession at all levels and in greater numbers, including AILA member Loriene Roy, who was elected as ALA President in 2007-2008. To honor that achievement, AILA revisited the topic at the 2007 ALA Annual Conference in Washington, D.C., with co-sponsorship by the ALA/ OLOS Subcommittee for Library Services to American Indian People. The program “American Indian Children’s Literature: Identifying and Celebrating the Good” included the handout “”I” is for Inclusion: The Portrayal of Native Americans in Books for Young People,” compiled by Caldwell, Mitten, and Gabriella Kaye, children’s librarian at the Mashantucket Pequot Museum & Research Center.

Native librarians such as Debbie Reese, through her invaluable blog American Indians in Children’s Literature, have kept the issue of representation in youth literature alive and moved it further into the mainstream. In 2006, AILA initiated the American Indian Youth Literature Awards (AIYLAs) at the first Joint Librarians of Color Conference to honor and promote American Indian authors and illustrators.

As an organization with a mission to improve information and library services to American Indian communities, AILA members have worked for nearly 40 years with support from the Association for Library Service to Children, the Office for Diversity, Literacy and Outreach Services, and other ALA divisions and groups, such as the Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA) and the Ethnic & Multicultural Information Exchange Round Table (EMERT), to identify and highlight the harmful stereotypes and depictions of American Indians in children’s literature. AILA is grateful to the ALSC leadership, task force, and librarians that understand that an award that honors children and young adult authors’ legacies should be one that respects the voices and cultures of all people in the United States, including those of Native American peoples. The name change of the award is a significant action by the library and literary communities that shows respect for American Indian peoples. We as nations and tribes are still here, and we will continue to share our cultures, languages, and voices with everyone around the world.

The American Indian Library Association is a membership action group that addresses the library-related needs of American Indians and Alaska Natives. Members are individuals and institutions interested in the development of programs to improve library cultural and informational services in school, public, and academic libraries. AILA is committed to disseminating information about Indian cultures, languages, values, and traditions to the library community. https://ailanet.org/

The American Indian Library Association is an Affiliate of the American Library Association. Affiliate organizations of the American Library Association are groups having purpose or interests similar to those of the Association.

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Middle Grade and YA Booklist

AILA Middle Grade and YA Book List

Created By: Naomi Bishop, MLIS Summer 2018

How I Became a Ghost: A Choctaw Trail of Tears Story
Tim Tingle
Roadrunner Press 2015

In the Footsteps of Crazy Horse
Joseph Marshall III
Amulet Books 2015

Native Athletes in Action!
Vincent Schilling
7th Generation 2016

Native Defenders of the Environment
Vincent Schilling
7th Generation 2012

Super Indian
Arigon Starr
Wacky Productions Unlimited 2012

Super Indian Volume 2
Arigon Starr
Wacky Productions Unlimited 2015

When a Ghost Talks Listen
Tim Tingle
Road Runner Press 2018

No Name
Tim Tingle
7th Generation 2014

No More No Name
Tim Tingle
7th Generation 2017

A Name Earned
Tim Tingle
7th Generation 2018

Urban Tribes: Native Americans in the City
Edited by Lisa Charleyboy & Mary Beth Leatherdale
Annick Press 2015

Everything You Wanted to Know About Indians but Were Afraid to Ask
Anton Treuer
Minnesota Historical Society Press 2012

Atlas of Indian Nations
Anton Treuer
National Geographic 2014

Dreaming in Indian Contemporary Native Voices
Edited by Lisa Charleyboy and Mary Beth Leatherdale
Annick Press 2014

Tales of the Mighty Code Talkers, Volume 1
Arigon Starr
Native Realities 2016

The Wool of Jonesy, Part 1
Jonathan Nelson
Native Realities 2016

Makoons
Louise Erdrich
HarperCollins 2016

Chickadee
Louise Erdrich
HarperCollins 2013

Free Throw and Triple Threat
Jacqueline Guest
Lorimer 2011

The Birchbark House
Louise Erdrich
HarperCollins, 2002
If I Ever Get Out of Here
Eric Gansworth
Scholastic, 2015

Give Me Some Truth
Eric Gansworth
Scholastic, 2018

#Not Your Princess: Voices of Native American Women
Lisa Charleyboy and Mary Beth Leatherdale
Annick Press, 2017

Pipestone: My Life in an Indian Boarding School
Adam Fortunate Eagle
University of Oklahoma Press, 2010

Her Land, Her Love
Evangeline Parsons Yazzie
Salina Bookshelf Inc., 2016

Her Enemy Her Love
Evangeline Parsons Yazzie
Salina Bookshelf Inc., 2017

Her Captive Her Love
Evangeline Parsons Yazzie
Salina Bookshelf Inc., 2018

Love Beyond Body, Space, and Time: An Indigenous LGBT Sci-Fi Anthology
Edited by Hope Nicholson
Bedside Press, 2016

Marrow Thieves
Cherie Dimaline DCB
Orca Books, 2017

Fire Starters
Jen Storm
HighWater Press, 2016

House of Purple Cedar
Tim Tingle
Cinco Puntos Press, 2016

Trail of the Dead
Joseph Bruchac
Tu Books, 2015

Killer of Enemies
Joseph Bruchac
Tu Books, 2013

Arrow of Lightening
Joseph Bruchac
Tu Books, 2017

Rose Eagle
Joseph Bruchac
Tu Books, 2014

Three Feathers
Richard Van Camp
Highwater Press, 2016

Hearts Unbroken
Cynthia Smith Leitich
Candlewick, 2018

Apple in the Middle
Dawn Quigley
North Dakota State University Press, 2018

Sixkiller
Lee Francis
Native Realities Press, 2018

Moonshot: The Indigenous Comics Collection, Volume 2
Edited by Hope Nicholson
Alternate History Comics Inc. 2017

Moonshot: The Indigenous Comics Collection
Edited by Hope Nicholson
Alternate History Comics Inc. 2015

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Children’s Book List

AILA Children’s Book List

Created by: Naomi Bishop, MLIS Summer 2018

Baby learns About
Beverly Blacksheep Salina Bookshelf Inc. 2004

I See Me
by Margaret Manuel Theytus Books, 2009

Little You
written by Richard Van Camp
Illustrated by Julie Flett
Orca Book Publishers, 2013

We Sang You Home Orca Books 2016

Shanyaak’utlaax: Salmon Boy
Illustrated by Tlingit artist Michaela Goade
Sealaska Heritage Institute, 2017

All Around Us
written by Xelena González and illustrated by Adriana M. Garcia
Cinco Puntos Press, 2017

Black Bear Red Fox
Julie Flett Native Northwest, 2017

Fall in Line, Holden!
Daniel W. Vandever Salina Bookshelf, Inc., 2017

I’m Dreaming of…Animals of the Native Northwest
by Melaney Gleeson-Lyall and illustrated by First Nations artists.
Native Northwest, 2017

Mission to Space
John Herrington
White Dog Press, 2016

Caribou Song, Atihko Oonagamoon
by Tomson Highway, John Rombough (illustrator)
Fifth House, 2012

Saltypie; A Choctaw Journey from Darkness into Light
by Tim Tingle, Karen Clarkson(Illustrator)
Cinco Puntos Press,

Mohala Mai ‘O Hau = How Hau Became Hau’ula
by Robert Lono ‘Ikuwa pictures by Matthew Kawika Ortiz
Kamehameha Schools Press;  Bilingual edition, 2010

Kohala Kuamo’o: Nae’ole’s Race to save a King
by Kekauleleana’ole Kawai’ae’a, Aaron Kawai’ae’a (Illustrator) story by Walter and Luana Kawai’ae’a
Kamehameha Schools Press; Bilingual edition, 2010

Celebrate My Hopi Corn
By Anita Poleahla illustrated by Emmett Navakuku
Salina Bookshelf Inc., 2016

A Coyote Solstice Tale by Thomas King
Gary Clement(Illustrator)
Groundwood Books, 2009

Fishing with Grandma
written by Susan Avingaq and Maren Vsetula | Illustrated by Charlene Chua
Inhabit Media, 2016

Kamik joins the Pack
by Darryl Baker (Author), QinLeng (Illustrator)
Inhabit Media, 2016

The People Shall Continue
Simon Ortiz
Lee and Low

Bowwow Powwow
by Brenda J. Child (Author), Jonathan Thunder (Illustrator)
Minnesota Historical Society Press; Bilingual edition, 2018

First Laugh Welcome Baby
by Rose Ann Tahe and Nancy Bo Flood Illustrator Jonathon Nelson
Charlesbridge, August 2018

We are Grateful
by Traci Sorell Illustrated by Frané Lessac
Charlesbridge, September 2018

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2018 AILA Awards

For Immediate Release Saturday, 02/10/2018

Contact: Naomi Bishop, MLIS President, American Indian Library Association

DENVER— The American Indian Library Association (AILA), an affiliate of the American Library Association (ALA), has selected “Shanyaak’utlaax: Salmon Boy” (2017), published by Sealaska Heritage Institute, edited by Tlingit speakers Johnny Marks, Hans Chester, David Katzeek, Nora Dauenhauer and Tlingit linguist Richard Dauenhauer and illustrated by Tlingit artist Michaela Goade as the 2018 AILA Best Picture Book; “Tales of the Mighty Code Talkers Volume 1” (2016), published by Native Realities, edited by Arigon Starr and featuring the work of Theo Tso, Jonathan Nelson, Kristina Bad Hand, Roy Boney Jr., Lee Francis IV, Johnnie Diacon, Weshoyot Alvitre, Renee Nejo, and Michael Sheyahshe as the 2018 AILA Best Middle School Book; and “#Not Your Princess: Voices of Native American Women” (2017),published by Annick Press, edited by Lisa Charleyboy and Mary Beth Leatherdale as the 2018 AILA Best Young Adult Book.

The American Indian Youth Literature Awards are presented every two years. The awards were established as a way to identify and honor the very best writing and illustrations by and about American Indians and Alaska Natives. Books selected to receive the award will present American Indians in the fullness of their humanity in the present and past contexts. Honor Books were selected each category.

2018 Picture Book Honors: All Around Us (2017), written by Xelena González and illustrated by Adriana M. Garcia, Cinco Puntos Press. Black Bear Red Fox (2017), written and illustrated by Julie Flett, Native Northwest. Fall in Line, Holden! (2017), written and illustrated by Daniel W. Vandever, Salina Bookshelf, Inc. I’m Dreaming Of…Animals of the Native Northwest (2017), written by Melaney Gleeson-Lyall and illustrated by First Nations Artists, Native Northwest. Mission to Space (2016), written and illustrated by John Herrington, White Dog Press.

2018 Middle Grade Honor Book:
The Wool of Jonesy Part 1(2016) written and illustrated by Jonathan Nelson, Native Realities.

2018 Young Adult Honor Books: Love Beyond Body, Space, and Time: An Indigenous LGBT Sci-Fi Anthology (2016) edited by Hope Nicholson, Bedside Press. Marrow Thieves (2017) written by Cherie Dimaline, DCB (submitted by Orca Books). Fire Starters (2016) written by Jen Storm; illustrated by Scott B. Henderson, and color artist Donovan Yaciuk, HighWater Press.

The American Indian Library Association is a membership action group that addresses the library-related needs of American Indians and Alaska Natives. Members are individuals and institutions interested in the development of programs to improve library cultural and informational services in school, public, and academic libraries. AILA is committed to disseminating information about Indian cultures, languages, values, and traditions to the library community. https://ailanet.org/

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Statement on Sherman Alexie

March 16, 2018

Dear AILA membership,

The Youth Literature Awards Committee and the Executive Board write to express full support for the people harmed by Sherman Alexie. We believe and commend the writers who have spoken up and extend our heartfelt compassion to those who have chosen to remain silent.

As librarians we have a significant influence on books that schools and libraries select. The AILA Youth Literature Awards were established in 2006 to honor Native authors and illustrators. The books we select represent the very best for our kids and our communities. We believe that writers are members of our communities who we can look to as role models for our youth.
We cannot, therefore, recommend Mr. Alexie’s books, and we have decided to rescind our 2008 Best YA Book Award for The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian. In rescinding this award, we hope to send an unequivocal message that Alexie’s actions are unacceptable.

Sexual harassment and abuse are not easy to report and discuss. If you or someone you know is experiencing sexual assault or harassment, one resource you can turn to is the Strong Hearts Helpline at http://www.strongheartshelpline.org/about/ .
Hope and healing can be found in books like #NotYourPrincess: Voices of Native American women. We selected it as our Best YA Book for 2018. #NotYourPrincess is a powerful anthology by Native American and First Nations women sharing their experiences through poems, essays, interviews, and art. It is one of many that AILA has selected for its awards. See information about the 2018 winners at http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2018/02/2018-aila-youth-literature-awards-announced.

The youth we serve today are here because their ancestors fought for their future and the well-being of their nations. It is in that spirit with which we write to you today.

Sincerely, AILA Youth Lit Committee
AILA Executive Board

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What Is a Tribal Library?

The definition of a tribal library varies across the U.S. The history and timeline of many tribal community libraries, archives, and cultural centers (museums) can somewhat be tracked through a handful of publications. However, as print resources become out of date, the need arises for an online central directory to keep the most up to date information on these tribal institutions. By creating this online educational resource map, we aim to help share the history of the American Indian Library Association (AILA) and tribal libraries, archives, and museums (TLAMs) across the country.

AILA Emerging Leaders put Tribal Libraries on the Map

The American Library Association (ALA) Emerging Leaders program provides library professionals with fewer than five years of experience working at a professional or paraprofessional level the opportunity to complete projects for ALA units and affiliates. This year the American Library Association Emerging Leaders team members: Rhiannon Sorrell, Aisha Conner-Gaten, Garrison Libby, Netanel Ganin, and Jessica Colbert selected to work on a project with AILA with project oversight by AILA President Lillian Chavez and past–president Naomi Bishop.

This team of early career librarians decided to work with the American Indian Library Association (AILA) to create a web-based directory of Tribal libraries, archives, and museums (TLAM). The directory includes names, contact information, locations, and the tribes/communities served by the institutions because they wanted help make tribal libraries more visible.

As a part of AILA’s proposed project for the 2018 cohort of Emerging Leaders, the project team created a digital resource to highlight US tribal libraries, archives, and museums (TLAMs) with the greater ALA , library, and education community. The project team created an online resource map to serve as a visual resource of TLAMs in the United States for the updated version of AILA’s website. In creating this resource, a number issues and concerns arose and the team considered them as cornerstones of the project. Issues of inaccuracy, privacy, and cultural competency, including the very definition of “Tribal Libraries” (and Archives, and Museums) were at the heart and creation of the directory. AILA will maintain the list online so feel free to submit your library, museum, archive, or cultural center to our list. https://triballibraries.wordpress.com/

In considering the definition of tribal libraries, several AILA members responded with their own definitions. Here are some of the responses:

  • “Tribal libraries provide more than library services. They also serve as archives, language repositories, heritage centers, museums, and a gateway to local, state, and federal service programs, learning centers, and community gathering places.” Cordelia Hooee, Pueblo of Zuni Governor’s Office Archive & Library
    “Tribal Libraries provides materials and services to help users obtain information, access to the Internet, and provides free and open access to print and non-print resources. Tribal Libraries can be a stand-alone department and/or a place to promote and preserve the tribe or sovereign nation’s culture and language.” Melanie Toledo, Ak-Chin Indian Community Library Manager
    “Not all indigenous people live on reservations in Alaska there is only one out of 250 villages, but the villages have cultural centers, museums, and community/school libraries in their communities.” Linda Wynne, Sealaska Corporation
    “A Tribal Library is on a reservation, meets tribal member needs, and has many collections, archival, preservation, curation and traditional programs.”- Lillian Chavez, Mescalero Community Library
    Lifelong learning to meet the informational, educational, cultural, and recreational needs and interests of Tribal members, community members, and employees of the Nation.
    A Tribal Library is a library established on Federal and State recognized tribal lands and Sovereign Indigenous Nations. “Tribal” may need to include libraries located within a tribal jurisdiction. Helen P. Clements Oklahoma State University Law Library
  • The Library provides tribal citizens as well as the public a wide range of reading materials, including children, teen and adult fiction, as well as a broad range of nonfiction and reference items. It provides programs to assist in the continuation of the Sac and Fox culture, tradition and language, to document tribal history, stimulate reading, writing, research, and scholarship, and provide an educational resource for achieving a greater understanding of the Sac and Fox way of life. Kathy Platt, Sac and Fox National Public Library and Archives
  • “A tribal library is a place or space identified as such by the tribe. A shelf of books in a hallway, in tribal council chambers, in Education Director’s offices and shared space with a food coop, an alcohol rehab center and other interesting places. Now, those libraries have their own large rooms or, in most cases, their own buildings. What matters is that the concept of a “library” takes root and develops. Tribal members recognize and acknowledge a “library” exists.” Lotsee Patterson
  • A Tribal library provides programs to assist in the continuation of culture, tradition and language, to document tribal history, stimulate reading, writing, research, and scholarship, and provide an educational resource for achieving a greater understanding of the way of life
  • “Tribal libraries vary widely in size, collections, staffing, and function. They can include public, academic, and special libraries. Many libraries serve more than one role in a tribal community. Some may support reservation schools while also functioning as a public library. Some act as research libraries or archives. Many tribal college libraries also serve as public libraries. Some communities might have more than one library serving tribal members.”(Brown, K. M., & Webster, K. P. (2014). Tribal Libraries: Vital but Often Invisible Treasures. OLA Quarterly, 12(4), 20-24. http://dx.doi.org/10.7710/1093-7374.1140)
  • “Tribal public libraries are learning centers central to their communities and promote literacy and education in young and old alike. Tribal public libraries serve as the only information resources in their community and provide the only internet access for tribal members. Tribal public libraries provide services and programming that support the unique needs of their communities. With the recent state of the economy tribal public libraries have seen an increase in community members utilizing library resources for job searches, filing unemployment, online classes, checking out materials, and participating in programs.” https://nmtriballibraries.wordpress.com/nm-tribal-libraries/

AILA and the Emerging Leaders team hope that this visual resource will highlight the variety and scope of U.S. tribal libraries. You can also check out AILAs Tumbler page created last year to share tribal libraries across the country and advocate for support of IMLS and LSTA grant funding. https://triballibrarystories.tumblr.com/

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A Test Post

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The American Indian Library Association @ ALA Annual June 21 – 26, 2018 New Orleans, LA

Friday, June 22, 2018
  • Southern Food and Beverage Museum Tour Hosted by Joint Council of Librarians of Color
    Register by June 20th – Cost is $10.00 http://www.jclcinc.org/conference/2018/jclc-emiert-tour-at-alaac18/
    11:30 AM – 1:30 PM
    1609 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd, New Orleans, LA
  • American Indian Library Association Executive Board Meeting
    2:30 PM – 3:30 PM
    Morial Convention Center, Rm 269
  • Opening General Session featuring Michelle Obama
    4:00 PM – 5:30 PM
    Morial Convention Center, Exhibit Hall F

Saturday, June 23, 2018

  • Native YA Today: Contemporary Indigenous Voices and Heros for the 21st Century & Beyond
    9:00 AM – 10:00 AM
    Morial Convention Center Rm 295
  • JCLC Social & Fundraising Reception
    5:30 PM – 7:00 PM
    Hilton New Orleans Riverside Quarterdeck Ballroom

Sunday, June 24, 2018

  • American Indian Library Association President’s Program 2018 class of Emerging Leaders will present an online directory of tribal libraries, archives, and museums in the United States
    9:00 AM – 10:00 AM
    Morial Convention Center, Rm 338-339
  • American Indian Library Association Business Meeting
    1:00 PM – 2:00 PM
    Morial Convention Center, Rm 350-351

Monday, June 25, 2018

  • ALSC Charlemae Rollins President’s Program: Considering All Children: A New Ideal in Evaluating and Engaging around Books for Youth
    1:00 PM – 2:30 PM
    Morial Convention Center, Rm 260-262

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The American Indian Library Association @ ALA Annual June 21 – 26, 2018 New Orleans, LA

Friday, June 22, 2018 Southern Food and Beverage Museum Tour Hosted by Joint Council of Librarians of Color Register by June 20th – Cost is $10.00 http://www.jclcinc.org/conference/2018/jclc-emiert-tour-at-alaac18/ 11:30 AM – 1:30 PM 1609 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd, New Orleans, LA American Indian Library Association Executive Board Meeting 2:30 PM – 3:30 PM Morial Convention Center, … Continue reading "The American Indian Library Association @ ALA Annual June 21 – 26, 2018 New Orleans, LA"

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See you at ALA Annual 2017!

Join us on Saturday, June 24, from 3-4pm in Hyatt Regency McCormick, Clark / CC 22AB for the AILA President’s Program featuring Ricardo Cate, Activism Through Art – My Time at Standing Rock.   Please also join us for these other AILA-sponsored events: SATURDAY, June 24 ODLOS Toolkit Showcase: New Tools You Can Use, 8:30 – […]

Fight to Save Tribal Library Funding: Share your IMLS Stories Today!

The American Indian Library Association (AILA) is calling on all tribal librarians, archivists, community members, and the public to share stories to help us fight for continued federal funding for the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). On March 16, 2017, President Donald Trump released his Budget Blueprint for 2018, also known as the […]

AILA Statement on Proposed Federal Budget

April 6, 2017 The American Indian Library Association (AILA) is strongly opposed to President Trump’s proposed federal budget that eliminates funding for the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), a federal agency that provides critical support for Native American, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian libraries, archives, and museums across the country. The IMLS Native […]

AILA at Midwinter 2017

ALA Midwinter ALA Midwinter Meeting 2017 will be held January 20-24, 2017, in Atlanta, Georgia, at the Georgia World Congress Center.  Join us for these AILA events! Friday, January 20, 2017 JCLC Peachtree Trolley Tour, 1:00-2:30pm p.m. Connect with your fellow JCLC supporters on a 90-minute Peachtree Trolley Tour of Atlanta and enjoy Atlanta’s sights, which […]

2016 AIYLA Announced

The American Indian Youth Literature Awards are presented every two years. The awards were established as a way to identify and honor the very best writing and illustrations by and about American Indians. Books selected to receive the award will present American Indians in the fullness of their humanity in the present and past contexts. […]

Livestream for #IILF2015

Watch 9th International Indigenous Librarians’ Forum #IILF2015 on @Livestream:https://t.co/ijjC0R4j0x

Book Review of “The National Council of Indian Opportunity”

Britten, Thomas A. The National Council on Indian Opportunity: Quiet Champion of Self-Determination. University of New Mexico Press, 2014. Reviewed by Faye Hadley Online Adjunct Professor, Research Methods in Indian Law, University of Tulsa College of Law While a bureaucratic history is hardly the stuff of the “page-turner” genre, Thomas A. Britten presents an important […]

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