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Native American news, videos and information from Indigenous communities, First Nations and Aboriginal people through out the world
Updated: 6 hours 49 min ago

Film Festivals, Native Fashion Shows and World Class Art at Indian Market Week

September 25, 2018 - 7:40pm

By Sandra Hale Schulman
- News From Indian Country(NFIC) -

The warm dry air of a Santa Fe summer welcomed hundreds of thousands of people from all over the world during the Santa Fe Indian Market Week. This year was filled with Film Festivals, actor appearances, concerts and more art and jewelry than could possibly be seen.

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Native News Update September 21, 2018

September 21, 2018 - 12:34pm

This week's stories:  Feds doubling funding to help combat violence against Native American women; Mayo Clinic apologizes for founders desecration of Chief Cut Nose; Fond du Lac Band files petition with the FCC to bring high-speed services to reservation; Assistant Secretary of Indian Affairs signs memorandum of understanding U.S. Department of Commerce and the AIANTA; Honor the Earth announces new grantees.

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John McCain: The ‘imperfect’ servant who (mostly) championed tribal sovereignty

September 20, 2018 - 9:30pm

By Mark Trahant
- ICT/NFIC -

How do we measure legacy? One act? Two? Can we assess the complete life or is our memory caught by the last thing we remember?

John Sidney McCain III has a legacy that defies answers to those questions. He is remembered as a patriot and a hero by many in Indian Country. Indeed, the list of his legislative accomplishments is long. Others say “no,” he forfeited being a hero when he inserted language into a defense bill to give sacred Apache land to a mining company.

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The Meaning of Consent:The Fond du Lac Ojibwe and Enbridge

September 20, 2018 - 7:10pm

By Winona LaDuke
- News From Indian Country(NFIC) -

“Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) is one of the most important principles that Indigenous Peoples believe can protect their right to participation. It is embedded in the right to self-determination. The duty of States to obtain Indigenous Peoples’ FPIC entitles Indigenous people to effectively determine the outcome of decision-making that affects them, not merely a right to be involved.” --UN Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

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Pori

September 19, 2018 - 6:48pm

By Arne Vainio, M.D.
News From Indian Country

She was thin and frail and ninety-four years old. She lay in the hospital bed and she only took a breath once in a while. I sat by her bedside and I timed my breaths with hers and I always had to take a breath before she did. I was twenty-one and this is the first time I saw someone go through the process of dying.

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It ain’t easy being Indian… (September 2018)

September 19, 2018 - 6:41pm

By Ricey Wild
News From Indian Country

Does anyone remember the movie “Tank Girl?” How Water & Power controlled everything and there were just a few holdouts protecting the last well of water left? Yes it’s a science fiction comic but I feel as though that very scenario is not far away. Water wars are already happening on every continent of this little blue planet where it was once abundant enough to give life and pure of contaminations.

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Madeline Island Giant Jingle Dress set for Treaty Day

September 18, 2018 - 6:22pm

The Madeline Island Jingle Dress Dancer will debut on September 30th on Madeline Island with other activities planned throughout the day. All Jingle Dress dancers are invited to come and dance.

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Native News Update September 14, 2018

September 14, 2018 - 9:17pm

This week's stories:  Oklahoma approves American Indian charter school; Tribal members see traditional house designs come to life; 2018 class of “Native American 40 Under 40” announced; NBA’s Thunder to wear Native American themed uniforms; Chickasaw Outpost opens online storefront.

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There is an encampment in Minneapolis populated by Indigenous people and it is growing

September 14, 2018 - 5:58pm

By Dr. Joe Hobot, Ed.D 
-  Special to News From Indian Country  -
 
People who have gathered there are the displaced, the unemployed, the addicted, the battered, and the sexually exploited. They have come home. They have come home to the community that they are now counting on for help, and they have come home to rest their weary bodies directly upon the lands of the Dakota to whom it belongs.

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Native News Update September 7, 2018

September 7, 2018 - 9:31pm

This week's stories: The National Park Service awards Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act grants; The Cherokee Nation receives grant to purchase eco-friendly electric buses; The Mississippi Band of Choctaw became the first tribe to offer sports betting outside of Nevada; The Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe recognized as a Purple Heart reservation; Seneca Niagara Resort & Casino to host the 18th Annual Native American Music Awards.

Native News Update with anchor Kimberlie Acosta from the studios of IndianCountryTV.com

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oZjXMqAi2P8&feature=youtu.be 

 


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Treasure Island - We are hiring!

September 5, 2018 - 1:34pm

Native News Update August 31, 2018

August 31, 2018 - 3:54pm

This week's stories: 16th-century Native American fort discovered; Albion College returns artifact back to the Zuni nation; Fund established to solarized Native American communities; Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation donates to endowment for Native American student scholarships; Karyl Frankiewicz crowned Miss Native American USA.

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Native News Update August 24, 2018

August 25, 2018 - 12:20am

This week's stories: Conference focuses on violence against Native American women; Basketball star, Kyrie Irving receives his Lakota name; Black Elk may become the Catholic Church’s second Native American saint; Twelve tribal colleges receive Edward Curtis’ artisanal Republication of The North American Indian; Native American elder Eleanor Spears Dove to receive lifetime achievement award.

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Gwich’in Nation calls for permanent protection of Arctic Refuge

August 23, 2018 - 8:27am

TSIIGEHTCHIC, - Northwest Territories -

During late June on the second day of the 2018 Gwich’in Gathering, delegates of the Gwich’in Nation unanimously reaffirmed a resolution to protect the birthplace and nursery grounds of the Porcupine caribou herd. The resolution calls for the United States Congress to recognize the human rights of the Gwich’in people by permanently protecting the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

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Elder Joe Rose, “ceremony is winning environmental battles”

August 22, 2018 - 3:54pm

By IndianCountryTV Staff
 - Odanah, Wisconsin (NFIC) -

Paul DeMain: Boozhoo Joe, tell us who you are and where you’re from.

Joe Rose: Okay. Boozhoo Ikwewug, inninwug gia, Mokangizis, Mashkizibi indonjiba, ninmide innini indow. To translate, my Anishinaabe name is The Rising Sun. I’m Eagle Clan of the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Ojibwe. A member of the Grand Medicine Society called the Midewiwin.

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Horses, Hemp and Solar Panels

August 22, 2018 - 2:20pm

By Winona LaDuke 
 - For News From Indian Country - 

Sometimes, let’s be honest; it’s hard not to hang your head with the challenges of these times. To counter this, I just pick my head up, and look around and find beauty.

Honor the Earth’s “Water is Life Concert” at Bayfront Park in Duluth featured the Indigo Girls, Corey Medina, Lyz Jakkola, Annie Humphrey and Chastity Brown, playing to a large crowd supporting the front lines of Water Protectors.

“We are tremendously grateful to these musicians,” Paul DeMain, Board Co-Chair of Honor the Earth told reporters.  “Honor the Earth celebrates music and art at the core of our mission, and this was a great gift for our work.”

At a federal level, in late July, the Senate approved the legalization of the hemp, ending a seventy-year ban on the plant which devastated a number of farms, and sent the US textile industry into a domination by petrochemicals present in rayon, polyester, and other “synthetic blends”

The renaissance opens the door for more tribal hemp farms, and hopefully a re-establishment of a viable hemp industry in North America.  

Elsewhere, Ireland not only banned fracking but decided to divest its nest egg from fossil fuels - joining $5 trillion in divestment worldwide. None too soon, as the Arctic faces a heat wave and forest fires. And fires rage from California to Washington. 

 

One of Many Irish Wind Farms

In the face of rising liabilities of climate change-related disasters, many investors are moving towards renewable energy and a commitment to a green economy. Some tribes want to move that way as well, both in practice and in investment.    

Red Lake Nation is moving ahead decisively with solar. The first phase of solar was installed on tribal buildings in late May, with two new expansion phases planned. The tribe estimates that savings will be nearly $2 million annually.  

Meanwhile, on the ground, twenty youth riders and a couple of stalwart horsewomen continue on a 200-mile ride along the proposed Enbridge Line 3 route in Minnesota. This is the sixth year of the spiritual ride against the current of the oil sponsored by Honor the Earth.

Beginning at Rice Lake Refuge, the riders rode on the formerly proposed  “Enbridge Preferred Route” which would have impacted Sandy Lake dramatically.  The most recent PUC rulings have eliminated this route, but a more northern route is not yet clarified.

Horse Riders also rode over Line 61 in the 2017 Love Water Not Oil Tour

The riders intend to ride and pray on the newly proposed route, reaffirming a commitment to water as sacred. This year, the riders have also helped out local farmers, providing some much needed Water Protector labor to gardens and some other small projects

 Many of the riders are from Crow Creek, Standing Rock, and Rosebud.  They came into their name Sungwatogok or Fearless Horse Society at Standing Rock, the name bestowed by the renowned horse teacher John Eagle.

The youth, ranging from l6 to 30 have ridden on numerous spiritual rides (Big Foot, Dakota 38, Fort Laramie Treaty Ride and others), including last year’s Honor the Earth ride.  This year, youth from Pine Point and East Lake take a more prominent place on the ride, learning from older riders about Dakota horse songs, culture and a way of life with horses. Horse songs are similar to jingle dress songs and are also offered for healing and praise. The ride will include visits to Rice Lake and more ceremonial teachings on horses in the upcoming weeks.

Over the longer term, more tribes are looking to move away from fossil fuels and to the next economy. Red Lake plans to provide 10 to 20 megawatts of electricity to be sold to the grid. “The development of these projects are designed to address our basic needs and understandings,” Red Lake Chairman Darrell G. Seki, Sr., said. “They include the preservation and conservation of our environment, providing an energy source which is compatible with our beliefs of living in harmony with nature, the diversification of our economy and investments, improving the quality of life, training for our labor force, and employment; jobs for our people.”

Horses, hemp, and solar panels provide an insight into that beautiful world, and to be sure, there are many who are ready for these changes.

 

 

 

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Sundance brings Native Cinema to Florida

August 21, 2018 - 7:48pm

By Sandra Hale Schulman 
 - News From Indian Country - 

Sundance brought some native films and filmmaking knowledge to South Florida this summer, with two screenings of short films and a seminar on filmmaking in conjunction with Native Reel Cinema Fest. Two of the filmmakers, Lyle Mitchell Corbine, Jr and Shaandiin Tome attended to take part in a Q&A with Bird Runningwater of Sundance.  

One public screening was held at O Cinema in Miami, with the second event at ArtServe in Fort Lauderdale, hosted by Everett Osceola and April Kirk of Native Reel Cinema Fest.

The films shown were all shorts that had previously been screened at Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah during their prestigious annual film festival that tens of thousands of major movers and shakers in the industry attend.

The films screened were:

ALTER-NATIVE: 17 ½ min

Billy Luther (Navajo/Hopi/Laguna Pueblo)

Alter-NATIVE follows a year in the life of Native American fashion designer Bethany Yellowtail as she develops her latest collection inspired by her art, activism, and indigenous women. Founded in December 2014 and based in Los Angeles, B.YELLOWTAIL is a clothing line created by designer Bethany Yellowtail, whose vision and brand values reflect her Apsaalooke (Crow) & Tsetsehestahese & So’taeo’o (Northern Cheyenne) tribal heritage. A celebration of ancestral tradition, beauty, and culture, B.YELLOWTAIL embraces an authentic voice of contemporary Native America through design and wearable art. She is shown designing her collection, producing fashion shoots and a runway show. Fans Taboo and Martin Sensmeier – who is tapped to play athlete Jim Thorpe in an upcoming film – are part of Bethany’s fashion world. The film has spawned a series on YouTube Channel Indie Lens Storycast.

Presented by Sundance Institute’s Native American and Indigenous Film Program and made possible with generous support from the Knight Foundation, the event included a reception and a Q&A  where the filmmakers discussed the challenges and rewards of making their first films.

Native Reel Cinema Fest is run by Everett Osceola of the Seminoles who received a $50,000 grant from the Knight Foundation last year. He produces a festival weekend at the Seminole Hard Rock in Hollywood every January, bringing in top native films and actors including Wes Studi, Graham Greene, and Irene Bedard.

The Seminar At ArtServe

The Violence Of A Civilization Without Secrets: 10 min

Adam Khalil (Ojibway)

Zach Khalil (Ojibway)

Jackson Polys (Tlingit)
An urgent reflection on indigenous sovereignty, the undead violence of museum archives, and postmortem justice through the case of the “Kennewick Man,” a prehistoric Paleo-American man whose remains were found in Kennewick, Washington, in 1996. The film raises important issues of lineage and who was in America first.

MUD (HASHTŁ’ISHNII): 10 min

Shaandiin Tome (Diné)

On her last day, Ruby faces the inescapable remnants of alcoholism, family, and culture. A searing portrait of a woman on a downward spiral who has visions of the mud that will eventually be her deathbed.

SHINAAB: 8 min

Lyle Mitchell Corbine Jr. (Bad River Band of the Lake Superior Chippewa Indians)

An Anishinaabe man is restless and isolated in the city of Minneapolis, haunted by an ominous sense that he doesn’t belong. He sits in diners, walks the streets, and come across a teepee in a field that may or may not be a vision.  Shinaab eerily portrays Indigenous people’s dislocation and alienation on their own land as sinister and enigmatic forces.

NUUCA: 13 min

Michelle Latimer (Métis/Algonquin)

The oil boom in North Dakota has brought tens of thousands of new people to the region, and with that has come an influx of drugs, crime, and sex trafficking. Over the last decade, an oil boom in North Dakota has seen the state’s population double with primarily male workers flocking to the region. With this dramatic increase has come an influx of drugs, crime and sexual violence. On the Fort Berthold Indian reservation alone, rates of sexual violence have increased 168%, with Indigenous women most affected. Juxtaposing the ravaged yet starkly beautiful landscape with personal testimony from young Indigenous women living on the reservation, Nuuca is an evocative meditation revealing the connections between the rape of the earth and the violence perpetrated against Indigenous women and girls.

JÁAJI APPROX.: 8 min

Sky Hopinka (Ho-Chunk/Pechanga)

Against landscapes that the artist and his father traversed, audio of the father in the Ho-Chunk language is transcribed using the International Phonetic Alphabet, which tapers off, narrowing the distance between recorder and recordings, new and traditional, memory and song.

 

 

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Nebraska Winnebago Become Solar Power Leader in Midwest

August 18, 2018 - 5:51pm

By KAREN UHLENHUTH  
 - WINNEBAGO, Neb. (AP) -  

The Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska already boasts 400 kilowatts of installed solar panels, more than nearly any other Midwestern American Indian tribe.

It doesn‘t plan to stop there.

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Native News Update August 17, 2018

August 17, 2018 - 10:22pm

This week's stories:  New Native American farm fund created as a result of the Keepseagle settlement; Office of Indian Energy funds 15 tribal energy infrastructure deployment projects; Cherokee Nation hosts attorneys from across the country; Myaamia Center receives grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities for revitalizing Indigenous languages; Navajo midwife has a vision to open a reproductive wellness and birth center.

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Honor The Earth presents - Winona's Annual Birthday Party

August 16, 2018 - 9:55pm

Join IndianCountryTV.com and Honor The Earth for a LIVE Broadcast from Tom's Burned Down Cafe, downtown LaPointe, on Madeline Island in Lake Superior on Friday, August 16, 2018.  7pm CST Indian Time. Winona LaDuke, and live Music with Corey Medina and guests.

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