EDUCATION

Vaccination mandate for in-person students

THE INDIAN LEADER - September 17, 2021 - 4:28pm

Haskell Indian Nations University (HINU) will now require students accessing university facilities to be vaccinated.

In a letter by interim University President Tamarah Pfeiffer, she states, “all students accessing any Haskell facility in-person must receive either a single-dose Food and Drug Administration (FDA) authorized or approved COVID-19 vaccine… or both doses of a two-dose FDA- authorized or approved vaccine no later than December 1, 2021.” All new students “…enrolling for the first time after December 1, 2021, must be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 prior to accessing any Haskell facility in person.”

The letter added, “Haskell will consider accommodation requests of students who are unable to get vaccinated due to a documented medical condition that would prevent the administration of a COVID-19 vaccination or a sincerely held religious belief on an individualized basis.”

This student mandate comes a week after all faculty and staff were ordered by federal mandate to be vaccinated against COVID-19. Faculty and staff must be vaccinated by October 15.

HINU is working in cooperation with the Haskell Indian Health Center for making vaccination and testing available on campus.


Full mandate for students here

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Spotlight on Head Women’s Basketball Coach Adam Strom

THE INDIAN LEADER - September 17, 2021 - 12:21pm

Co-written by James Cadotte and Jared Nally


Head Women’s Basketball Coach Adam Strom (Yakama Nation and Quinault Indian Nation), brings over 20 years of coaching experience to Haskell Indian Nations University(HINU). Haskell Athletics is hopeful he will bring the university a championship in his upcoming seasons.

Strom was announced as the new Women’s Head Basketball Coach on May 4, by the Haskell Athletics Department. The department acknowledges his loyalty to his previous programs that would bring stability to the recent turnover of coaches. 

Strom has coached 15 years of high school basketball and has also coached 5 years at Yakima Valley College. He said with his past experience at the collegiate level he has the “… ability to recruit quality student-athletes with the emphasis on student.”

Prior to the start of the season, Strom said he played an active part in recruiting students for the upcoming season. He looks forward to bringing success to the program with success not necessarily being measured with championships, but given his background, Haskell Athletics is confident in his ability to win. 

“We anticipate he will make our department proud and bring a championship back to Coffin Sports Complex and the Fightin’ Indians!” Haskell Athletics said in their May 4 announcement.

The Women’s Basketball Program has its first match-up on October 28. This will be their first official game after sitting out the 2020-21 season.

The post Spotlight on Head Women’s Basketball Coach Adam Strom appeared first on The Indian Leader.

Diné College Increases Minimum Wage to $15 an Hour

TRIBAL COLLEGE JOURNAL - September 16, 2021 - 12:10pm

The college’s president, Dr. Charles “Monty” Roessel, stated that the college could not ask an employee to work during a pandemic for less than $10 per hour.

The post Diné College Increases Minimum Wage to $15 an Hour appeared first on Tribal College Journal of American Indian Higher Education.

Sisseton Wahpeton College to Offer Baccalaureate Programs

TRIBAL COLLEGE JOURNAL - September 16, 2021 - 12:06pm

SWC is happy to announce that it will offer a Bachelor of Science in Behavioral Science and a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration beginning in the spring 2022 semester.

The post Sisseton Wahpeton College to Offer Baccalaureate Programs appeared first on Tribal College Journal of American Indian Higher Education.

Honoring the Hope that Accompanies Recovery

TRIBAL COLLEGE JOURNAL - September 16, 2021 - 11:54am

September is National Recovery Month and as we journey through it, let’s take the time to honor the resilience of those who inspire so many of us.

The post Honoring the Hope that Accompanies Recovery appeared first on Tribal College Journal of American Indian Higher Education.

Opinion: Reservation Dogs balances Native comedy with authentic representation

THE INDIAN LEADER - September 14, 2021 - 5:00pm

The new FX series on Hulu “Reservation Dogs” breaks away from long-standing stereotypes and cliches and presents a realistic portrayal of Native American culture — authentic writing and creators who know what they’re talking about. The series follows four teenagers living on a reservation in Oklahoma. They work together to save up money to escape the weighing issues within their community and move to California.

The depiction of Native Americans in the entertainment industry has been heavily stereotyped and uneducated throughout the years. We all know the cliche tropes of the ‘savage Indian’ or the ‘magical Indian’ who speaks to nature and practices spells with sage. Let’s not forget the horror movie trope of cursed houses built over Indian burial grounds. “Reservation Dogs” manages to separate itself from these caricature depictions of Native culture, finally delving into realistic, and in some ways, educational representation.

Both show creators Sterlin Harjo and Taika Waititi have Indigenous backgrounds, so the audience can experience an authentic portrayal of life on a reservation — where rez dogs run the streets, everyone’s down for a trip to “Sonics,” and has probably been visited by an ancestor. A spirit on a horse who speaks about bravery anyone…no? Although some jokes and references might go over the heads of those unfamiliar with Native slang and customs, it still manages to pull everyone in with its comedic approach, particularly Native teens who will find the characters relatable. After all, haven’t we all wondered where we fit into life or sought an escape? The show does an exceptional job expressing real matters found in Native reservations while still being entertaining and comedic.

It’s astounding the number of Native problems that are not known or talked about in mass media outside Indian Country. “Reservation Dogs” introduces the issues of subpar healthcare, crime rates, and more on reservations. It is nice to see those problems brought to light along with a realistic representation of our culture. We are more than characters and mascots but real people who dream and experience love and loss and who like greasy, greasy fry bread!

The post Opinion: Reservation Dogs balances Native comedy with authentic representation appeared first on The Indian Leader.

RALLY on Jayhawk Boulevard

THE INDIAN LEADER - September 14, 2021 - 10:41am

Sept. 13 — The First Nations Student Association rallied together in front of Wescoe Hall on Jayhawk Boulevard to bring awareness to the University of Kansas (KU) that Indigenous students are here on campus and they are hurt by what was done to the artwork displayed outside the Spencer Museum of Art.

The incident occurred on September 4 at 11:08 PM. Four out of five pieces of the 2021 Common Work of Art installation by Hock E Aye Vi Edgar Heap of Birds (Cheyenne and Arapaho) were vandalized. This act hurt many Indigenous and non-Indigenous students at KU and Haskell Indian Nations University (HINU). Currently, no arrests have been made. A statement by the KU Chancellor was made only after Indigenous students rallied. “Their silence shows that they weren’t there to support us, and that has hurt us as Jayhawks and as Indigenous people,” said Tweesna Rose Mills ( Eastern Shoshone-Yakama-Umatilla Nations), KU student in the Film and Media Studies Masters program and the Co-chair of the First Nations Student Association.

The rally was a way for those who were hurt by the incident or wanted to support their fellow students to gather, sing songs, and pray together. Rose Mills said, “I find it disturbing that someone could do that to another alumni… and act like nothing happened.” Many will view this gathering as a protest but that is not the case with what occurred today. Rose Mill said, “The difference between a protest and a rally is that when you protest, you fight against something. That’s not what we are doing. Yes, it is wrong, but that’s not what we are doing. With a rally, we are here for understanding. We want you to understand how we were hurt together as Indigenous and non-Indigenous alike.” Asking questions is just the beginning of a relationship between the Indigenous and non-Indigenous students at the University of Kansas.

Steven Laravie Jr. (Ponca Tribe of Nebraska), a Senior at HINU said, “I wanted to come and see how our people were going to react to it and see how we were going to show the beauty of who we are through relationships,” and added, “If we can speak out into the community about that beauty of us, we doing our part. Sit down and share a meal. Get to know each other.”

There were many who attended the rally, both Indigenous and non-Indigenous, to show support for those who were hurt. “Yes what happened was bad but what comes from it is good. We gathered together and prayed with each other. Supported one another. That’s what this is for,” said Rose Mills.


Featured image courtesy of Laura Beth Helen Kingston, communications coordinator at KU

The post RALLY on Jayhawk Boulevard appeared first on The Indian Leader.

Keweenaw Bay Ojibwa Community College Calls for Masks on Campus

TRIBAL COLLEGE JOURNAL - September 13, 2021 - 1:09pm

Due to a rise in cases of COVID-19 in the area the school has chosen make masks mandatory, now that the college sits at a level 2 in their Health and Safety protocols.

The post Keweenaw Bay Ojibwa Community College Calls for Masks on Campus appeared first on Tribal College Journal of American Indian Higher Education.

Sean Chandler: The One Defined To Be No One

TRIBAL COLLEGE JOURNAL - September 13, 2021 - 1:09pm

The exhibition is Sean Chandler’s first solo exhibition in Montana and the first significant exhibition in recent years.

The post Sean Chandler: The One Defined To Be No One appeared first on Tribal College Journal of American Indian Higher Education.

National group recognizes Yukon teacher for bringing Indigenous culture into the classroom

CBC ABORIGINAL NEWS - September 11, 2021 - 8:00am
Pat Joe

Pat Joe of the Kwanlin Dün First Nation is an outspoken advocate for her culture and values. Now, she's being recognized by the Canadian Teachers’ Federation for her contributions to education in the Yukon.

Categories: CANADA, EDUCATION, WOMEN

Flags will remain at half-mast until agreement is reached with Indigenous leaders: Trudeau

CBC ABORIGINAL NEWS - September 10, 2021 - 12:53pm
Half-mast Peace Tower

Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau said he plans to keep Canadian flags on federal buildings at half-mast in honour of the residential school students who never came home until Indigenous communities and their leaders decide when it's appropriate to raise them again.

Young Indigenous man who stole leaders debate spotlight says his question had to be asked

CBC ABORIGINAL NEWS - September 10, 2021 - 11:30am
Marek McLeod

A young Indigenous man many have called the breakout star of Thursday night’s English-language leaders debate has said politicians need to do more to address reconciliation.

P.E.I. to recognize National Day of Truth and Reconciliation

CBC ABORIGINAL NEWS - September 9, 2021 - 3:04pm
Residential School Remains 20210715

Prince Edward Island will recognize September 30 as National Day of Truth and Reconciliation.

Ontario will not make National Day for Truth and Reconciliation a provincial holiday

CBC ABORIGINAL NEWS - September 9, 2021 - 9:06am
215 KAMLOOPS QP SHOE MEMORIAL

The Ontario government will not be making National Day for Truth and Reconciliation a provincial holiday, a government spokesperson confirmed.

Wednesday, September 8, 2021

NATIONAL NATIVE NEWS (nativetimes.net) - September 8, 2021 - 12:02pm

Fort Lewis College hosts an event to remove Indian boarding school panels. (Photo-Fort Lewis College, Facebook)

Deal reached to bring dozens of Navajo homes electricity Fort Lewis College removes boarding school panels Labor Secretary says tribes included in federal support

The post Wednesday, September 8, 2021 appeared first on National Native News, by Antonia Gonzales.

Former Sir John A. Macdonald High School now called Bay View High School

CBC ABORIGINAL NEWS - September 7, 2021 - 5:00am
The name of Sir John A. MacDonald High School has officially been changed to Bay View High School.

Students returning to class at the high school in Tantallon will see some big changes.

Categories: CANADA, EDUCATION

Local entrepreneur sets sights on Pow Wow Pitch grand prize

CBC ABORIGINAL NEWS - September 5, 2021 - 6:00am
Tyler French

A member of Chippewas of the Thames First Nation is one step closer to winning a national competition to support Indigenous entrepreneurs. Tyler French is creating an events facility and museum that could bring clean drinking water and high speed internet to his First Nation community.

Northern Manitoba chiefs eager for in-person schooling to return, worry students are falling behind

CBC ABORIGINAL NEWS - September 5, 2021 - 4:00am
School in Pimicikamak

Two First Nations chiefs in northern Manitoba are eager to get their students back inside classrooms after more than a year of disruptions due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Whither the bison: What happened to the Prairies' once-mighty herds?

CBC ABORIGINAL NEWS - September 5, 2021 - 4:00am
Bison Boxcar

Where did the bison go? How could so many disappear in a few decades?

Nova Scotia to recognize National Day for Truth and Reconciliation starting this year

CBC ABORIGINAL NEWS - September 3, 2021 - 6:59pm
Red dress

The provincial government says the day will acknowledge the legacy of Canada's residential schools and the role it plays in the reconciliation process.

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